bite my words

Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Grocery Store Lessons: Nutella & GO!

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Just when I think that everyone must know by now that Nutella, while admittedly delicious, is not part of a healthy breakfast, I hear a woman on the radio saying that she feeds her kids healthfully and gives them toast with Nutella about three times a week. I’ve said it before, putting Nutella on toast is essentially turning it into a candy bar. Well, lest spreading Nutella on your toast in the morning is too time consuming, or you want a Nutellalicious snack as well, there’s now “Nutella & GO!”, a single serve portable package of little bread sticks and Nutella.

But Nutella has nuts and milk, right? It must be a healthier option than a chocolate bar. Nope. The first ingredient? Sugar. The second ingredient? Modified palm oil. In one little package, there is 270 calories, 23 grams of sugar (that’s nearly 6 teaspoons!!!), and 14 grams of fat. On the upside, there’s 4 grams of protein, and 4% of your daily recommended calcium. Compare that to a chocolate bar (we’ll use Snickers as it’s apparently the best selling chocolate bar in North America): 250 calories, 27 grams of sugar, 12 grams of fat, 4 grams of protein, and 4% of your daily recommended calcium. Yes, a Snickers bar has an extra teaspoon of sugar, but aside from that they are quite similar. Other chocolate bars have similar or lesser quantities of sugar than Nutella & GO!

Sure, Nutella can be a tasty treat, but it’s certainly not a healthy one.


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Follow Friday: sugar-free challenge

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Photo Sugar City by What What on flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Licence.

For the past several years I’ve adopted a different diet for Lent. This year I’ve decided to try going sugar-free. To be fair, not completely sugar free. I’ll still be consuming naturally occurring sugars in foods such as fruit and yoghurt. However, I’m going to be giving up all added sugars. This means no chocolate, baked goods, candy, honey, maple syrup, dried fruit, etc. No, I’m not religious, I just find it to be a good opportunity to try new things and experience ways of living that can help me be a better dietitian.

Anyone want to try to do this with me this year?

If you’re interested, as much as I wasn’t a huge fan of the Fed-Up movie, they have some helpful resources on their website. I have a feeling that this may be the most difficult challenge yet.


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National Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast and other unnecessary food holidays

Last week someone shared this tweet from the Cleveland Clinic:

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Not ideal from a provider of healthcare. I’m sure many children are getting more sugar from breakfast cereal and juice in the morning but that doesn’t excuse the fact that ice cream is not a balanced breakfast and the Cleveland Clinic should know better.

That got me to thinking about food holidays. It seems to me that most of these holidays promote unhealthy foods, foods that really need no promotion. I decided to do a little number crunching.

Based on the food holidays listed on Foodimentary, I added up all of the food holidays, all of the holidays promoting unhealthy choices, and all of the holidays promoting healthy foods. Out of 475 food holidays, 250 were for unhealthy foods (e.g. candy, doughnuts), and 81 were for healthy foods (e.g. kale, almonds). Do we really need all of these days devoted to promoting treats? How about we start a new calendar of food holidays promoting a different whole food every day? We don’t need to encourage anyone to eat ice cream, especially not for breakfast.


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Is it unethical for dietitians to sell supplements?

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Eggcup of Pills photo by John Twohig on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Licence.

Something happened recently that kind of blew my mind. I was always under the impression that it was a conflict of interest for a dietitian to sell supplements. Short of causing someone harm, in my mind, it was pretty much one of the most blatantly wrong things that a dietitian could do. In my mind, it still is, but according to at least one College of Dietitians, it’s not.

I happened to be exploring a fellow dietitian’s website, as I’d seen them make some questionable assertions in blog posts. You know, the sort of sensational “sexy” hype that I’m always saying we RDs don’t make. I happened to notice that they had a “shop” in which you could purchase several supplements. I shared this information with a friend, another dietitian, who passed it along to a contact at the College in their region. The response indicated that this might be a concern; however, if there is scientific backing for the supplements, as long as clients don’t feel pressured into purchasing supplements, while not ideal, it’s kind of okay. What??

One of the main reasons that many mainstream healthcare professionals take an exception to some alternative healthcare professionals is that they peddle supplements to their clients. It shouldn’t matter how much science there is supporting the use of a supplement. For any healthcare professional to receive direct compensation for the sale of a supplement or drug is a clear conflict of interest. No matter how amazing the supplement may be, no matter how questionable the supplement may be, the potential to profit from its sale to a client can cloud the judgement of even the most upstanding healthcare provider.

I can understand the desire to make money by selling things. It can be tough to make a living as a dietitian. A supplement may seem like a fitting choice. However, it undermines our credibility. For one thing, there is little evidence to support the use of most nutritional supplements. Imagine the more extreme scenario: You go to see your doctor who diagnoses you with disease X. Fortunately, there is cure Y which she can sell you. Can you not see the potential for corruption? misdiagnosis? Unnecessary treatment? Incorrect treatment? Despite the best of intentions, this can happen when the person who is assessing your condition is also selling you the cure. It’s unethical for healthcare providers to profit from a direct sale of a treatment.

If you ever visit a healthcare professional who offers to sell you a treatment or cure, please report them to their governing body. Get a second opinion. Do some research. We need you to ensure that all healthcare professionals are doing their utmost to ethically optimize your health.


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Follow Friday: #28daysofkind

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I know that I just had my KIND bar give away a couple of weeks ago. I hope you’re not all overwhelmed with KINDness. I know, I know, that was terrible. Sorry. Anyway… This post was not sponsored. I am receiving nothing in compensation from KIND for sharing the details about their great 28 Days of Kind initiative in conjunction with Greatist.

Apparently February 17th is Random Acts of Kindness Day. KIND snacks and Greatist decided to take it one step further. They’ve created a calendar with suggested acts of kindness for every day in February. What better way to bring some sunshine to the coldest dreariest month of the year? There’s also more in it for you than pure altruism. If you share your kind deeds on twitter using the #28daysofkind tag you could win a year’s worth of KIND bars for the remainder of 2015! Sign me up! Today’s challenge: Bring your coworkers a special treat.

While you’re on the Greatist website you should check out some of their workouts. There’s some great inspiration there like the best kettlebell exercises.