bite my words

Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

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Brunch Bowls

Diana:

These look so delicious! Love all of the combo suggestions. :)

Originally posted on Gluten Free Rosie:

At the weekends, I’m currently really, really into making these things called brunch bowls. These are basically the components of brunch, slightly deconstructed. Simple, but so good!

I think people sometimes forget that savoury food is actually an option for breakfast! Or more precisely, they don’t realise it’s ok to eat the type of food you may eat for lunch and supper first thing in the morning. I get that psychologically this may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but we shouldn’t feel like a cereal packet is the only option.

Brunch bowls are an amazing way to get creative.

A reason to pump some healthful variety into your diet.

A useful prompt to make use of those random bits of food in your fridge, before you spot them a week later and have to chuck it in the bin.

So what do they look like..?

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Hello brunch bowl

(awful photography, camera currently out of action)

Gluten-free Rosie brunch bowl

The…

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Follow Friday: Grapefruit for diabetes

Photo by Emma on Flickr used under a Creative Commons Licence.

Photo by Emma on Flickr used under a Creative Commons Licence.

I had been planning on writing a post about the latest headlines heralding grapefruit juice as the greatest thing since Metformin. According to the news articles you’d think that grapefruit juice will prevent obesity and diabetes. Read, and interpret, the actual research and you get a slightly different story. Fortunately, the NHS has saved me the trouble and written a great critical review.


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Got lactose intolerance? More dairy is the answer! (The role of industry in education)

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Last week I participated in a webinar about “dairy’s role in lactose intolerance”. It was presented by Today’s Dietitian and sponsored by Danone. This is a shining example of why industry should not have a place at the table in nutrition education and policy.

The first part of the presentation was fine. It was a review of lactose intolerance prevalence, methods of diagnosing lactose intolerance, symptoms, and so on. Of course, the importance of dairy products in a nutritious diet was impressed upon us. This, despite the fact that they aren’t truly necessary. Yes, dairy can be an easy source of protein, calcium, B12, and vitamin D (this because it’s added, not naturally occurring in dairy) but it’s still possible to obtain these nutrients from other foods.

The second part was where I started to get really annoyed. I should have expected it. It was a webinar developed by dietitians working for Danone but the blatant bias still irritated me. It was discussed how much lactose could be tolerated by those who are lactose intolerant (apparently about 12 grams in a sitting). Recommendations by the NMA (National Medical Association) apparently state that even those suffering from lactose intolerance should still aim to consume three servings of dairy products each day. Their recommendations include: gradually increasing exposure to lactose-containing foods, including low-lactose dairy products such as yoghurt and lactose-free milk, and using lactase enzyme supplements. No suggestion of alternative sources of the nutrients that are available in dairy products. Nope.

I think my favourite slide was the one listing a number of milk alternatives; such as, almond, coconut, soy, and rice “milks”. Descriptions that make them all sounds ever so appealing were used. Soy milk “Off-white/yellowish color”, rice milk “watery texture”. No mention of the nutritional aspects of the milk alternatives. Funny, as in at least one aspect, they are inferior, they all contain significantly less protein than cow’s milk. I think that presenting the nutrition information would have been much more informative than presenting subjective descriptions. I’m of the mind that it’s much better to let people make up their own minds as to whether or not they like a food and I’m pretty disappointed that a presentation by a fellow dietitian would disparage foods based on their own subjective opinion.

Finally, there’s part three of the presentation “lactose-intolerant friendly dishes”. Every single one of these dishes contain dairy. Good grief. My personal fave, “cheesy guacamole” containing both cottage cheese and cheddar cheese. Um… Since when does guacamole contain cheese??? Why on earth would suggested recipes for lactose-intolerant individuals take a naturally lactose-free dish and add lactose? And this is why many people don’t take dietitians seriously. Sigh.


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Parasites for gluten!

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A friend alerted me to this article last week. Before we look at the actual research study, I need to say this is terrible reporting. The headline proclaims: Gluten allergies may be reduced using hookworms. No. Well, maybe. But probably not, and that’s certainly not what the study was looking at. No wonder people are confused about gluten. The study looked at the effect of hookworms on gluten tolerance in individuals with celiac disease. Which, we know, is not an allergy. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease in which consumption of gluten results in the destruction of microvilli in the small intestine in sufferers. Gluten allergy is a hypersensitivity of the immune system to the gluten (or one of its component proteins) protein. So… if you are allergic to gluten, don’t go infect yourself with hookworms and eat a sandwich. I wouldn’t recommend doing this if you have celiac disease either.

Looking at the actual study… It was very small (12 people, two of whom withdrew from the study before completion). When a study is so small, it’s impossible to say if the results would extend to the majority of those with celiac disease. Setting aside the fact that I’m doubtful that the majority of celiac disease sufferers would willingly ingest hookworms in order to be able to consume gluten again. That being said, it’s quite interesting that the study participants were able to gradually increase their gluten intake to 3 g of spaghetti a day without experiencing any overt, nor covert (i.e. intestinal damage) symptoms of celiac disease. Of course, that’s not a lot of gluten (about one cup of pasta a day) and the study took place over 12 weeks, with the largest quantity of pasta being consumed over the final two weeks. It would be interesting to see if intestinal damage was visible after an extended period of time or if greater quantities of gluten could be consumed.

Something else that I wondered about when reading the article was any potential complications from the use of hookworms. According to the Centre for Disease Control, most people with hookworms experience no symptoms. However, some many experience gastrointestinal distress and the most serious complication is blood loss leading to anemia, and protein loss.

Essentially, celiac disease leads to nutritional deficiencies when gluten is consumed. Introducing hookworms may allow celiac disease sufferers to consume gluten but may also lead to nutrient deficiencies. Alternatively, celiac disease sufferers can follow a nutritious gluten-free diet.