bite my words

Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Skeptic or jerk? What’s the difference?

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Eternal Damnation by Stephen L. Cloud used under a Creative Commons Licence.

Last week I tweeted the question “When did skeptic become synonymous with a**hole?” (except without the asterisks because I’m much more brazen on twitter). Something I’ve been noticing a lot lately is that people seem to be using their self-proclaimed skeptic status as justification for being condescending and rude to other people. If you know me at all, you know that I don’t suffer fools gladly. It’s damn hard to bite your tongue in the face of ignorance and stupidity. However, I don’t understand why it’s become acceptable (especially on social media) to be patently rude to other people just because they have different opinions or beliefs than you do. And those are people that you’re attacking; not avatars, not bots. You’re not advancing your cause by insulting those who disagree with you.

The definition of skeptic (according to google) is: “a person inclined to question or doubt all accepted opinions.” I consider myself a skeptic. I question most things. I tend not to believe anything until I see evidence. That’s skepticism to me. It would appear that skepticism to many skeptics is belittling or insulting those who don’t hold the same values as themselves. Interestingly, most of those I’m seeing lately are not questioning accepted opinions, only tearing down those who dare to question the status quo. I’m pro science. That doesn’t mean that I unquestioningly accept every piece of scientific research and discredit every unproven theory. There is a plethora of terrible scientific research out there. Loads of poorly designed and biased studies are published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. We also haven’t done all of the science that there is to science so there’s always the possibility that unproven theories will one day be proved. Being a skeptic means questioning everything, not just the non-science, and not just the beliefs held by others. We need to hold ourselves and our beliefs up to the same level of scrutiny as all others.

Insulting other people doesn’t make you a skeptic. It just makes you a jerk.


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Gwyneth Paltrow and the Seven Limes

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Photo (7) Seven limes by Wikioticslan on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Licence.

A few weeks ago everyone was mocking Gwyneth Paltrow’s food choices for a week-long food stamp challenge. Admittedly, they were a little ridiculous. I mean, it was nice to see that she chose things like dried beans, frozen peas, eggs, and some fresh vegetables. However, along with everyone else, I thought “seven limes??!“. Unless she got an amazing deal on those limes they seem like a nutritionally foolish expense. I saw some people posting their superior $29 selections. When Gwyneth failed to last more than four days on the challenge it seemed like everyone was more than a little gleeful. I saw others bragging about their success.

As much as we all like to take pleasure in Gwyn’s failures, I think that we may have lost the point. The point of this food stamp challenge is to show people how difficult it is to survive on such a limited food budget. To that end, it’s a good thing that Gwyneth failed. If she had happily lived on that little food budget then that would mean that all people living on food stamps should be able to contentedly survive on $29 of food a week.

Regardless of the choices that Gwyneth made, there’s little room for pleasure or flavour in such a meagre food budget. Note that there was no money for cooking oil, condiments, spices, or staples like flour and sugar. No coffee, tea, no chocolate! It’s nigh on impossible for someone to feed a family a basic nutritious diet when they are forced to rely on food stamps. More important here than Gwyneth’s failure to do so is the failure of the government to provide its citizens with the means to afford healthy, palatable food.


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Follow Friday: @healthiqapp

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You guys, I am so addicted to this Health I.Q. app. Forget trivia crack. This is where it’s at. Just a bunch of nutrition and health-related quizzes. You earn points and see how you scored in comparison to everyone else. You can even redeem your points for healthish awards (I’ve got my eye on a three-month subscription to Nature Box). Questions are all vetted by healthcare professionals so they’re generally pretty good. If you do take exception to any of them you can dispute it after you answer. There are also discussion boards (which are not moderated by the healthcare professionals so don’t trust everything you read on them) where you can see tips from others and add your own on various topics. It’s a pretty fun way to test your knowledge and pick-up some new information while you’re at it.


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Everything you want to know (and probably more) about vitamin K

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No ranting today. No raving either. A little while ago, a friend asked me to write a post about vitamin K-rich foods. So, this post is just straight-up info for those who are interested in learning more about vitamin K.

You may be wondering, “What is vitamin K?” (if you’re not, feel free to skip on ahead to the next paragraph). Vitamin K is a family of compounds including phylloquinone (vitamin K1) which is found in plants, and menaquinones (vitamin K2) which are found in fish oils and meats (thanks old nutrition textbook: Perspectives in Nutrition by Wardlaw and Hampl).

Vitamin K is essential for blood clotting. Fun fact: the Danish researcher who discovered the relationship between vitamin K and blood clotting named it for the word “koagulation” (which, in case you couldn’t guess, translates to “coagulation” in English). The adequate intake for women is 90 mcg a day, for men, 120 mcg, based on typical adult intakes. In addition to food sources of vitamin K, microorganisms in our intestines also produce vitamin K.

Although, vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin, there is no upper limit set for consumption as it tends to disappear from the body within a few days of consumption. However, high dose supplements are not recommended as the synthetic form of vitamin K is far more potent than the naturally occurring forms as has been found to cause hemolytic anemia in rats and severe jaundice in infants. Vitamin K deficiency is also relatively uncommon. It’s most likely to be seen in people who have fat malabsorption (e.g. celiac disease or some types of bariatric surgery), long-term antibiotic use, or seniors with little consumption of leafy green vegetables. Newborn infants are routinely given vitamin K injections within 6 hours of delivery as they are at risk of defective blood clotting and hemorrhaging as a result of vitamin K deficiency. It’s important for people taking blood thinners, and some other medications, to consume consistent (or limit) amounts of vitamin K containing foods to ensure efficacy of the medications.

As alluded to above, leafy greens are the primary dietary source of vitamin K. Kale tops the list at 530 mcg per 1/2 cup (cooked), followed by turnip greens (520 mcg per cup), spinach (480 mcg/cup), brussels sprouts (150 mcg per 1/2 cup), raw spinach or cooked asparagus (144 mcg/cup), cooked broccoli (110 mcg for 1/2 cup), and looseleaf lettuce (97 mcg/cup). Other good sources of vitamin K include: cooked green beans (48 mcg per 1/2 cup), raw cabbage (42 mcg/cup), sauerkraut (30 mcg per 1/2 cup), green peas (26 mcg per 1/2 cup), soybean oil (25 mcg/tbsp), and cooked cauliflower (20 mcg/cup).