bite my words

Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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I guess some RDs are sexy

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Eat big meals… Fat goes quick! Photo by L’imaGiraphe (en travaux) on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons LIcence.

Right on the heels of my post about we dietitians not being sexy, this article comes out in the Daily Mail, and I’m forced to eat my words (good thing there are no forbidden foods!). Dietitian Trudi Deakin is proclaiming a high-fat, low-carb diet to be the be all and end all, and she’s written the book to “prove” it. Sigh.

Now, as you (my regular readers) know, I’m certainly not one to shy away from fat. New readers, My original by line was “real dietitians eat butter”. However, I also subscribe to the school of thought that says too much of anything is bad for you. Be it fat, salt, sugar, or carrots. You can have too much of a good thing. According to Trudi, saturated fat is the key. While it’s become widely accepted that saturated fat is not the demon it was once believed to be, that doesn’t mean that it’s suddenly a dietary super hero.

Trudi claims that her diet is 82% fat, and she’s never felt healthier. She alleges that high-carb diets are fuelling the obesity epidemic. The gist is that low-fat was wrong so low-carb must be right. Why do we have to go from one extreme to another? I’ll say the same thing about this that I said about demonizing sugar: blaming one nutrient for obesity or chronic disease isn’t getting us anywhere. These are complex problems that aren’t going to be remedied with simple solutions.

This 82% fat has me curious though. What would a diet that’s 82% fat look like? According to Trudi:

BREAKFAST: Three eggs cooked in the microwave with butter and cheese, like a souffle, served with oily fish – smoked salmon or mackerel – or avocado.

LUNCH:A bowl of berries with double cream or a homemade walnut scone, made with ground almonds rather than flour, served with double cream

DINNER: Meat or fish with a serving of vegetables cooked in butter 

Just for fun, I entered this meal plan into my fitness pal to find out the breakdown. Obviously without quantities, it’s near impossible to say exactly what caloric and macronutrient totals would look like. Based on one serving of each of the items listed above, I would only be consuming 995 kcal, and fat would account for roughly 40% of these. If Trudi’s diet is being accurately reported, she’s obviously consuming greater quantities than I recorded, particularly of the high-fat foods. Regardless, it doesn’t sounds overly appealing to me. I’d rather be a few pounds heavier and die a couple of years earlier than never have cereal for breakfast, never snack, and put butter on everything (as much as I love butter).

While Trudi may be content with this restrictive diet for now, it will be interesting to see what will happen with time. Most people following low-carb diets find them to be extremely difficult to follow over the long-term and usually relinquish them. Aside from the difficulty adhering to these low-carb, high-fat diets, there are other risk factors to consider.

Children with epililepsy following ketogenic diets provide us with some insight into the long term effects of a ketogenic diet. A study of children following a ketogenic diet found that poor growth was common. Other side effects were kidney stones and bone fractures.

There’s some other misinformation in the article. Trudi states that she consumes 30 grams of protein at breakfast because “your body doesn’t store it.” Um… I don’t know where this is coming from. While 30 calories at breakfast is certainly reasonable, excess calories, regardless of macronutrient, will be stored as fat.

The unfortunate thing about most weight management research is that “long term” equals several months to a year. While someone might experience weight loss, and find a high-fat diet relatively easy to adhere to for a few months, years, or a lifetime, are a far different story. Trudi’s been following this diet for less than year. Let’s see the tune she’s singing in a decade. Until then, you might want to take her high-fat diet with a grain of salt, or better yet, a baked potato.


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Follow Friday: BS Medicine Podcast

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I used to be a big fan of the Skeptics Guide to the Universe Podcast. I love listening to podcasts on long runs. However, their tone has really turned me off. It’s one thing to be right about stuff, and understandable to get annoyed with misinformation (not that I would know anything about that, no, nope, not I), and a whole other thing to be condescending jerks about it. Cue Best Science Medicine Podcast (thanks to my friend Emma for telling me about it). It’s a Canadian podcast that shares recent scientific research and developments in an accessible way. James McCormack and Michael Allan try to present the information in an interesting and entertaining manner. Well worth checking out on your run, commute, or whenever else you listen to podcasts.


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Are we all really getting too much protein?

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This story is one of the oldest ones. When I was study nutrition in university I remember learning that most of us eat more protein than we need. While it’s undoubtedly true in most cases. It’s a little bit more complicated than: we eat more protein than we need to, end of story.

It’s important to note that there are a number of times that protein requirements are increased, such as for athletes, those recovering from injuries, and those endeavouring to lose weight. However, the recommendation for adults is roughly 45-50 grams of protein per day; more precisely, 0.9 grams per pound of body weight. We can easily eat this in one meal. And the problem is that many of us do eat this in one meal, neglecting the rest of our meals.

New research is indicating that we can’t utilize anymore than 20 grams of protein at one sitting. This means that, while we may be consuming plenty of protein at supper time, we may still not be getting enough protein. Many of us neglect breakfast. Even if we consume breakfast it’s often toast or cereal and many of us don’t get any more than 7 grams of protein in the morning. Distribution is important. To optimize protein utilization we should aim to consume 15-20 grams of protein at each meal. This may mean rethinking breakfast, and supper for that matter. Try to incorporate protein-rich foods at breakfast (e.g. eggs, beans, nuts, seeds, Greek yoghurt) and try to eat more meatless meals for supper. When having meat for supper don’t make it the biggest item on your plate. Treat meat like an accoutrement and make vegetables the stars of your suppers.


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Sorry, dietitians just aren’t sexy

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Something that’s been weighing on my mind a bit lately is the disappointment that many people seem to have with dietitians and the reasons for this. Basically, it boils down to the fact that we’re not sexy. Nope, we can’t tell you the next great superfood you must buy daily (spoiler: there is no such thing as a “superfood”). We won’t recommend any breakthrough weight loss supplement; sorry, whatever Dr. Oz is selling we’re not buying. We won’t tell you “never eat these five foods“. And we won’t tell you that paleo, Atkins, low-carb, low-fat, gluten-free, vegan, <insert any trendy diet here>, is the best diet.

There are no shortcuts to health. There are no foods that you should never ever eat (I mean, obviously, there are some foods that should be consumed on an occasional basis, such as candy, and others on a regular one, such as vegetables). But we’re never going to tell you not to eat something. We’re also never going to tell you what diet to follow. Our job is to help you figure out the diet that works best for you and how to optimize it to make it as enjoyable and healthy as possible.

Yes, I know that there are loads of other people out there who are more than happy to tell you that their diet is the best, the only, the diet to end all diets. I know that, that level of certainty can be alluring. It’s much more appealing to have someone tell you exactly what you may and may not eat when you’re struggling on your own. It’s not easy to hear that no foods are off the table and that no superfood is going to swoop in to the rescue. However, let’s not confuse confidence with competence. Dietitians are here to help you make the best choices for you, not to impose our own dietary regimes on you. Maybe we’re not sexy or fun or exciting but we’ll be here for you when all of those other diets let you down.


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Follow Friday: Me in Best Health Mag

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Before the holidays I was interviewed by Lisa Bendall for Best Health Mag, a companion web magazine for Reader’s Digest. The article: 8 ways to feel full faster just went up the other day. Of course I had a lot more to say than made the cut but at least the content seems to be fairly accurate :)

A couple of things I wish had made it in there: discussion about Brian Wansink’s research, discussion about volumetrics. Volumetrics is the use of eating foods with low calorie density so that you can eat a larger quantity. As we tend to eat with our eyes a big plate of salad can be more satisfying than a candy bar even though it has fewer calories. In addition, there’s been research showing that recipes that have been modified to decrease caloric content by increasing vegetable content (e.g. mac and cheese incorporating pureed cauliflower) are just as satisfying as their full-calorie original counterparts.

We also talked about some things that have frequently been touted as ways to feel full and lose weight that have been disproved. For example, the consumption of a glass of water prior to a meal. Water can be satisfying when we’re mistaking thirst for hunger, but consuming water before supper does not lead to consuming fewer calories at the meal.

What it really all boils down to are a few key tips: preventative eating (eat before you get too hungry so that you can make rational dietary decisions), eat more vegetables, chew your food, include protein with all meals (especially breakfast) and snacks.