bite my words

Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


Leave a comment

Grocery store lessons: Greek yoghurt

PicFrame

I’ve extolled the virtues of Greek yoghurt in the past. It’s a pretty great source of protein at up to 18 grams in 3/4 of a cup! Of course, once something gets popular you know that the knock-offs aren’t far behind. I think that nearly every brand of yoghurt now has their own line of Greeks on the market. Unfortunately, many of them aren’t actually Greek yoghurt.

True Greek yoghurt is made by straining regular yoghurt so that you’re left with a thick creamy yoghurt. This separation of the whey (that’s the watery stuff that’s strained out) leaves the Greek yoghurt rich in protein but also removes some of the calcium… It can’t all be good, right? While a serving of plain yoghurt has about 30% of your daily recommended calcium, a serving of Greek yoghurt only has about 15% of your daily recommended calcium. But I digress…

What’s wrong with the “knock-off” Greek yoghurts? Well, they’re not strained. Instead of just containing milk and bacterial culture they add thickeners like carrageenan, corn starch and pectin to achieve a thick Greek-style creaminess. They also add milk protein to bump up the protein content but from the ones I’ve seen that still only puts them at 8 grams of protein per serving. That’s actually less protein than you’ll find in many traditional plain yoghurts. Most of them also tend to be targeted at the “dieting” community so they’re sweetened with artificial sweeteners. And lest you think “at least I’m still getting the calcium I would from traditional yoghurt” you’re probably only getting about 10% of the Daily Value.

If protein and a thick creamy yoghurt are what you’re looking for make sure to check the ingredient panel as well as the Nutrition Facts Panel to ensure you’re getting exactly what you bargained for. When it comes to yoghurt ingredients, less is definitely more.

*The photo above shows the Nutrition Facts for a traditional Greek yoghurt and a “knock-off” Greek. Can you tell which is which?


Leave a comment

Don’t cry over chocolate milk

url

I know that I just recently blogged about flavoured milk in schools but I can’t resist commenting on this Masters Thesis on Flavored Milk Consumption in School Systems and its Effect on the BodyThis topic really gets under my skin and it especially annoyed me to see a dietetic maters thesis supporting the dairy industry and their propaganda.

The thesis looked at milk consumption of students in one school who were obligated to have a carton of milk on their trays at lunchtime. On the first day students were offered both white and flavoured (chocolate and strawberry) milks, as was presumably the norm. On the second day they were offered only white milk. The third day was the same as the first. Milk consumption was measured by weighing the milk remaining in the cartons at the end of each meal. It was found that milk consumption was about 9% less on the second day than it was on the first. Thus, it was argued that students were missing out on consuming calcium, and other essential nutrients, as a result of only being offered white milk.

Firstly, we have no idea what the students were consuming throughout the rest of the day. All we have is milk consumption at lunchtime over three days. There is no way we can conclude from this information that students were consuming inadequate calcium when they were only offered white milk. We also can not conclude that they were consuming sufficient calcium when they were offered both flavoured and white milk.

Secondly, of course children are going to choose chocolate milk over white milk when it’s offered. Chocolate milk is far tastier than white milk.

Thirdly, a 9% decrease in milk consumption isn’t really that much. When you think about it, this was after one day. What might happen if children were only offered white milk over a longer period of time? Perhaps their consumption of white milk would increase.

Why is it always argued that children need to have flavoured milk for them to drink it? Should we be sweetening everything to make it more palatable to them? If we never offered them chocolate milk in the first place we wouldn’t have this problem.

 

The paper indicates that many people believe that chocolate milk is contributing to the obesity epidemic and this is why we must stop serving it in schools. Chocolate milk is not single-handedly making children obese. I think the problem is more that we are constantly feeding children products that are filled with added sweeteners, sodium, and flavouring to get them to eat them. This is setting them up for a lifetime of dependence on the food industry trifecta of sugar, salt, and fat. We need to break the cycle. We need to be grown-ups and start deciding what our children eat and drink rather than letting the food industry make that decision for us.


Leave a comment

Strong bones

Last week a US government advisory group announced that there is no benefit for healthy “older” women to take low-dose calcium or vitamin D supplements. These conclusions were based on findings that these supplements do not appear to reduce the risk of broken bones.

There are a few important things to note about this pronouncement: 1. This message applies only to healthy older women. Women who are suffering from certain illnesses may require more of some nutrients and should consult with their doctor before stopping (or starting) any supplement regimen. 2. The advisory group did not look at higher supplement doses. There may be benefits (or risks) to consuming higher supplemental doses. 3. The announcement was based on risk of broken bones in comparison to risk of kidney stones. The advisory group did not look at any benefits of supplementation other than bone health. There may be additional benefits to vitamin D supplementation (again, or risks) we just don’t have sufficient research to advise on this basis yet.

I think that the most important lesson we can take away from this study is that many illnesses that befall us when we’re elderly are a result of exposures and lifestyle during our youth. As I remember learning in school: osteoporosis is a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences. We can’t mistreat or neglect our bodies when we’re young and then expect to make up for it when we’re elderly. To ensure strong healthy bones as seniors we need to ensure that children and young adults consume healthy balanced diets; including adequate vitamin D (which may require supplementation) and calcium. Children also need to engage in regular physical activity and we need to continue to exercise throughout our lives to maintain muscle mass and strong bones.

While it’s never too late to start leading a healthy life, it’s also never too early.


3 Comments

The many faces of calcium

A few people commented on a post last week regarding calcium. I thought that I’d write a little bit more about calcium to clear up a few questions.

The first is calcium in foods. While certain foods such as spinach are a good source of calcium (about 31 mg per raw cup) they may also contain other components (in the case of spinach, oxalic acid) which bind to the calcium and inhibit absorption. Foods that are high in oxalic acid include: sweet potatoes, rhubarb, and beans. Foods that are high in phytic acid include: high fibre foods and grains, beans, nuts, and seeds. Studies have not been able to determine the full extent to which these inhibitors actually affect absorption; however, if calcium is a nutrient that you may not be getting enough of it is worth considering consuming calcium-rich foods in meals separate from these foods. You may have also heard that coffee and tea can lower calcium absorption. They do increase calcium excretion due to the caffeine but the amount is insignificant (about 2-3 mg) so you can continue to drink your lattes to get your calcium if that’s your thing.

The amount of calcium consumed in a sitting can affect absorption. Absorption rates are highest at amounts of 500 mg or less. Thus, taking lower dose supplements spread throughout the day is likely to be of more benefit than taking one large dose a day. The type of calcium supplement you take makes a difference as well. Calcium carbonate (the most common supplemental form of calcium) is 40% calcium and should be taken with meals as stomach acid is necessary for proper absorption. Calcium citrate is more expensive than calcium carbonate, is 21% calcium, but need not be taken with meals for absorption. Other, less common forms of calcium supplements are: calcium phosphate (38% calcium), calcium lactate (13%), and calcium gluconate (9%).

Other factors can increase the absorption of calcium present in foods. For example, a cup of cooked spinach provides about 250 mg of calcium. Consumption of vitamin D also increases calcium absorption. Your age and need for calcium also impacts absorption rates. Calcium absorption is highest in young children and in women during pregnancy as it’s needed for building bone mass. Absorption continues to decrease throughout adulthood; hence higher recommended consumption amounts for women over age 50 and all adults over 70.

As mentioned previously, milk, and fortified milk alternatives, are all good sources of calcium. In addition, here are a few more sources to consider: plain yoghurt (450 mg/cup), Parmesan cheese (390 mg/oz), canned salmon, with bones (210 mg/3 oz), tofu, made with calcium carbonate (140 mg/0.5 cup), kale, cooked (99 mg/cup), dry roasted almonds (85 mg/25 nuts).


3 Comments

Got fortified cow beverage?

I’m getting caught-up on my nutrition article reading. You may have seen headlines all over the news a few weeks ago about how many children are drinking too much milk.

I think that many parents have been convinced, dare I say by the dairy industry (under the guise of Canada’s Food Guide), that children need lots and lots of milk to have strong teeth and bones. Unfortunately for all of us milk loathers who suffered through the dreaded milk program in grade school, this is not true. Yes, milk is a good source of protein (8 grams per cup), calcium (30% of our daily needs as adults), and vitamin D (45% DV – although it’s important to point out that cow’s milk is fortified with vitamin D so I don’t really think it should be praised for that). The thing is, there are plenty of other foods that contain these nutrients. If your child suffers from lactose intolerance or a milk allergy they are not going to develop rickets or osteoporosis (yes, it’s a pediatric disease with adult consequences) as long as they obtain enough of these nutrients from other sources. If you’re child just doesn’t like milk, or you choose not to serve them milk for whatever reason, they can still live healthy and productive lives.

One of the reasons that excessive milk consumption in children is an issue is that it tends to lead to insufficient consumption of other nutrients, specifically iron. Iron deficiency can lead to anemia which can be indicated by paleness, fatigue, decreased immune function. There is also the potential for poor growth and development as a result.

Good food sources of iron include: oat bran cereal, clams, spinach, beans and lentils, tofu, egg yolks, beef, and baked potatoes. Using uncoated cast iron cookware (especially to cook acidic foods such as tomato sauce) can also increase iron consumption. Consuming vitamin C containing foods (such as citrus fruits, peppers, and tomatoes) with iron-containing foods can also increase the amount of iron absorbed.

Good food sources of protein include: tuna (and other fish), poultry, meat, beans, legumes, yoghurt, tofu, nuts, eggs, even grains.

Good food sources of calcium include: yoghurt, fortified orange juice, many cheeses, spinach and other dark leafy greens (kale, broccoli, asparagus), tinned salmon (with bones) and sardines, fortified cereals, and tofu.

Good food sources of vitamin D include: egg yolks, fatty fish (herring, eel, salmon, sardines, tuna), and fortified cereals.

There is a huge proliferation of “milks” on the market these days. You’re no longer limited to cow’s milk or soy milk. There’s almond milk, coconut milk, sunflower milk, quinoa milk, hemp milk, rice milk… The choices can be overwhelming. The first thing you should check for is added sugar. No need to consume any more sugar than we already do. Next, check your labels to ensure your “milk” is fortified. Finally, check for unwanted ingredients like added oils. Beyond those tips, go for what you (or your child) actually likes. With all the options available you should be able to find one that will be both pleasing to your palate and provide the nutrients you need.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,031 other followers