bite my words

Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


Leave a comment

Follow Friday: @gloomchen

This isn’t your usual Follow Friday. I’m not telling you that you should follow my fito friend Summer (aka Gloomchen on twitter and fitocracy) although you should. Rather, I’m encouraging everyone who can afford to, to donate to her indie gogo campaign.

She’s trying to raise the money to get much needed surgery. She lost over 140 lbs and has kept it off for over ten years now. If you’ve ever scrolled through one of her fito workouts you know that she works HARD to maintain this loss. As you can imagine, weight loss of this magnitude has left her with some loose skin. This is both a physical and psychological burden. However, it’s not covered by health care so she needs to come up with enough money to cover the cost of the procedure and recovery. While she has been saving money for some time now she still needs $6, 500 (not counting donations already pledged). Please visit the link above to donate and to view her youtube channel. If you are unable to donate, please share the link with your social networks.


2 Comments

Dr Oz gets schooled and says: #sorrynotsorry

url-1

I’m sure that the whole Dr-Oz-goes-to-the-senate-and-gets-scolded thing is going to be all over all of the blogs for at least the next few days. Despite this, I still feel the need to throw my voice into the fray. I’ve ranted about Dr Oz and his ridiculous supplement (and dietary) proclamations many a time (too many for me to be bothered to even give you a link right now, feel free to search my blog for my scorn). It’s not just weight loss that’s a problem. It’s pretty much every dietary and supplement recommendation that he’s made. Eat a papaya every day? Come on, are we made of money (perhaps Dr Oz should read yesterdays post)? And what happened to variety is the spice of life. Any dietitian worthy of the “RD” after their name will tell you that variety is a key component of a healthy diet.

But that’s all history now, right? Dr Oz, the great and powerful Oz, has (gasp!) apologised for his role in the popularization of useless weight loss supplements. Does this really sound like the words of someone who is truly sorry: “For years I felt that because I did not sell any products that I could be enthusiastic in my coverage and I believe the research surrounding the products I cover has value.”? What I see here is Oz saying that by not putting his name on any product labels that he thought it was okay to tout each and every one of them as the next great MIRACLE weight loss cure on his show. Even more importantly, I see that Oz still believes in the “research” conducted on the products he promotes. Never mind that most of them have little to no scientific research to support their use as weight loss supplements. Never mind that those that do have research invariably have weak biased research. Never mind that he conducted his own “research” into the efficacy of green coffee bean extract using audience members.

Do I think that we’ll see any meaningful change as a result of this hearing? I doubt it. Dr Oz doesn’t believe that he’s done anything sincerely wrong and what he does is popular. Horrifyingly popular. Just a taste of some of the comments on his facebook “apology”:

Dr.Oz, you are amazing. You get people excited about living healthier and happier lives! You show is interesting, lively and is very enjoyable as well as more importantly very informative to watch. Thank you!!!

You have done far more good in your career than any other public medical professional, helping people take responsibility for their health and promoting preventive care and wellness. Don’t listen to the politicians, who are the MOST self-serving of our population and sell out every day to lobbying money. You owe no apologies.

You are a good doctor, and you have done nothing wrong. I am glad you stood up for what is right. Keep on doing what you do best Dr. Oz…
They go on and on in that vein. People want miracle cures. They don’t want to hear that losing weight (and keeping it off) is hard work. That’s why Dr Oz has 4.6 million likes on FB and a syndicated television show and dietitians (like yours truly) are tapping away writing unpaid blogs about nutrition in their spare time. As long as Dr Oz is being given a platform, as long as the network is getting the ratings, and as long as the public are swallowing every pill he proffers he is going to keep dishing them out.

 


11 Comments

The “real food” fallacy

url

All of a sudden, it seems that Zoe Harcombe is everywhere. She was providing ludicrous nutrition advice for sufferers of yeast infections (thanks @RD_Catherine for the link). Sorry y’all yoghurt won’t cure yeast infections. Yes, choosing a yoghurt with probiotics is great for overall health but it’s more because of the by-products produced by the bacteria (e.g. B vitamins) than because of the bacteria themselves. Unfortunately, most of the bacteria in yoghurt will not survive your stomach acid.

What I really want to address though, is her popular article in the Daily Mail (thanks to @ERHWG for sharing the article and her rage): Diets Make Us Fat. The Solution is Simple. The basic premise is that we need to eat “real food” as opposed to fake  “manufactured food”. Calories don’t matter, and we shouldn’t be counting them. All that matters is eating “real food”.

But what is “real food”? I don’t think you’ll find many dietitians who disagree with the importance of cooking and eating more vegetables, fruits, and minimally processed foods for overall health and weight loss. However, I don’t think the division between “real” and “fake” food is particularly useful. Nor is the vilification of whole grains. Grocery shopping is complicated enough and people are hard-pressed for time. Making them feel guilty for buying anything in a package is not going to help them to adopt healthier habits.

It’s also possible to be over weight when consuming a “real food” diet. You know why? Because calories do matter. I’ve met plenty of people who are over weight who eat very healthy diets. Simply telling people that if they eat “real food” is not going to solve the obesity crisis. If I was over weight and someone gave me this advice I would be insulted. Not everyone who is over weight or obese is subsisting on a diet of big macs and kit kat bars. Consuming more calories than we need, regardless of the source, will result in weight gain.

Finally, the reason that diets don’t work is because they’re short-term fixes. Not because people are necessarily consuming the wrong types of foods or because they’re counting calories. The problem with diets is that they have an end date. They are not sustainable lifestyle changes. The other reason that they don’t work is because our food system is broken. Our environment is structured such that the unhealthy choice is the easiest choice and it’s a lot of work not to be over weight. Placing the onus on the individual and suggesting that if they only stopped counting calories and ate “real food” doesn’t even come close to addressing the true societal roots of the obesity epidemic.


1 Comment

Let them drink pop: Water doesn’t = weight loss

Water-Soda-Poster

Big News: “Water not a ‘magic bullet’ for weight loss“. While I don’t dispute any of the information presented in the article, I do take issue with a major fact that is not presented in the article. 

The article states that the vast majority of research has shown no increase in weight loss for those who consume more water versus those who do not. Drinking water does not increase caloric burn. The article also dismisses the pervasive myth that beverages such as coffee do not contribute to overall hydration – YAY! All true. 

The article then quotes the RD as saying, “if you don’t like water it’s OK.” The idea is that you can obtain your hydration from other beverages (and foods). While absolutely true from a hydration standpoint, I think that this statement does a disservice to those who are attempting to lose weight. While I’m sure it was not her intent, I think that this could easily be interpreted to mean that it’s fine to choose beverages such as juice, pop, and coffee with sugar and cream rather than a glass of water. Yes, these will all hydrate you, however, they will also add non-satiating calories to your diet. If you drink just one 8 oz glass of orange juice, one 12 oz can of Coke, and one medium double-double (sorry, non-Canadian readers) a day you’ll be adding 458 calories to your daily intake. Compare that to zero calories from three glasses of water. 

Obviously weight loss is not as simple as replacing caloric beverages with water (or non-caloric beverages) but that can certainly be a part of it. To suggest that all beverages are equal is untrue and misleading. Water doesn’t boost your calorie burn but it can minimize your overall caloric consumption if you replace caloric beverages with it. 


5 Comments

Low-fat vs low-carb

url

There’s a lot to unpack from this Daily Mail article a friend alerted me to. The premise: a couple of identical twin doctors decide they need to lose weight. In order to determine which fad diet is better, one goes low-carb, the other goes low-fat. The fact that they are genetically identical and maintained similar levels of physical activity means that they assumed any differences observed would be due to diet. While there is merit to using identical twins in research studies it’s important to note that this was not a scientific experiment. One subject in each group doesn’t lead to robust findings. Other issues: obviously both men knew which diet they were on and there was no control group. So, this wasn’t good science but it’s still possible that we could learn something interesting from their little “experiment”.

Before we look at what they “learned” from the experiment there are a few things in the article that I want to touch on. Firstly, the headline states that “one twin gave up sugar”. Well, yes, but this twin also restricted all forms of carbohydrate, not just sugar. The twin who went on the low-carb diet thought that it would be effective because of the insulin hypothesis of weight gain.

Because these carbohydrates are highly refined, they tend to raise blood sugars and blood insulin levels quickly.  This will tend to cause weight gain and obesity.  This is known as the Carbohydrate-Insulin Hypothesis (CIH), and is the basis of the Atkins diet and many other low carbohydrate (Dukan) and very-low-carbohydrate diets (ketogenic diet). (1)

While it sounds convincing, we know this hypothesis to be incorrect. For one thing, there are many people/populations who consume high-carbohydrate diets and never develop obesity. For another, insulin on its own does not cause obesity (2). Minor quibble, really, but as doctors discussing weight loss they should have their facts straight. Obesity is complicated and there’s no smoking gun out there.

An important point that they make is:

…despite being doctors – I also have a degree in public health – neither of us knew much about losing weight and eating healthily. 

These topics fall between the cracks at medical school. Yes, we understood biochemistry and food metabolism, and knew a lot about the consequences of being overweight. But which diets work, why we eat too much and why losing weight is so hard don’t sit within any medical speciality.

Pity that they didn’t take the opportunity at this stage to point out that this means that assuming your family doctor will tell you if your weight is a health concern or that they are a good resource for weight loss are dangerous assumptions. If you are concerned about your weight being a health issue you need to speak up and voice those concerns. Ask for a referral to a dietitian who specialises in weight management or to a reputable weight management clinic. I really wish they would have mentioned the great resource that we dietitians can be for all things diet and nutrition.

As you may have guessed, both doctors lost weight during the course of their experiment. I hope that they were the only ones who were surprised by this outcome. Naturally they lost weight; they were both on highly restrictive diets, they were both active males, and this was done over a very short period of time (one month). Imagine trying to sustain a diet with the barest minimum of fat or no carbohydrates for the rest of your life!

Fortunately, the doctors reached a conclusion that I actually agree with! That: “For any diet to work you have to be able to keep it up for the rest of your life.”  As I’ve said many times before: to see sustainable weight loss you need to make sustainable changes.