Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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11 easy steps to get a youthful body like J.Lo

So, you want to tap into the fountain of youth like Jennifer Lopez? According to this article all you need to do is to follow her nutrition regimen. Simple enough, right? They’re the typical celeb nutrition tips: drink more water, cut-out sugar, don’t drink caffeine or alcohol, eat “clean”, yada, yada. Then be super disappointed when you don’t look like J.Lo and you’re miserable because all the joy has been removed from eating. Fear not, because I can tell you the real step-by-step foolproof way to obtain Jennifer Lopez’s body:

  1. Get rich.
  2. Hire a personal trainer and find time to workout for several hours a day.
  3. Hire a personal chef and/or “nutritionist” who will prepare all of your “clean” meals for you.
  4. Have the right genetics. This one is important, steps one through three will only work if you have “optimal” genetic material to start. Without this, no amount of kale or pilates will help you to become three inches shorter or to grow an inch.
  5. Hire a make-up artist so that your skin always looks perfect.
  6. Hire a stylist so that your clothing is always a perfect fit and super stylish.
  7. Hire a hair stylist so that you’re never seen with limp or frizzy hair in public.
  8. Hire a PR firm so that no imperfect images of you ever make it to the public.
  9. Hire a personal assistant so that you don’t have to worry about any of the trivial day-to-day concerns that the plebeians concern themselves with.
  10. If you have children, have a nanny or two so that you don’t have to tire yourself out caring for them.
  11. Consider plastic surgery. J.Lo may not need it but without it your breasts, waist, hips, etc. may never look like hers.

Follow these easy eleven steps and you too, can look just like Jennifer Lopez.


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Book Review: @thefuckitdiet

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This review is not going to be as thorough as I like to be. I listened to this book on Audible while I was doing other things like cooking, cleaning, and walking the dog so I didn’t take notes and I wasn’t always paying the closest attention. That being said, for the most part, I thought it was great.

The overall message of the book is that we need to stop being so hard on ourselves for doing something as natural as eating food. That in order to reestablish a healthy relationship with food we need to stop dieting altogether and give ourselves permission to consume food in ways that we have told ourselves is “wrong”. For example, allowing ourselves to eat foods we’ve told ourselves are “bad” and allowing ourselves to overeat. This book is basically about undoing the conditioning we’ve done to ourselves over the years by making eating emotionally fraught.

The only real issue I took with any of the book was with some of the science, which I found to be questionable. I should have taken notes because I can’t remember exactly what Dooner was saying and having listened to the audiobook it’s not like I can easily flip to the references to look things up. I do remember her talking about the causes of candida overgrowth and mention of heavy metals being the cause (not sugar consumption). As far as I’m aware, there is still a lack of quality research in this area, and we really don’t know what causes some women to be prone to yeast infections. Dooner also mentions Chris Kresser as a source at one point (no, not a source of candida, but as an expert on something – again, I should have taken notes). I’m not a fan of Kresser. He’s got something to sell and claims to have the cure for everything that ails us. His website is a trove of red flags when it comes to nutrition information and he’s an acupuncturist and anti-vaxxer who cured his own chronic illness. Not someone I would want to be associated with. Anyway… as long as you don’t get hung-up on the science, I think that a lot of people could benefit from this book.

Dooner offers practical actions for the reader to undertake that should help move them closer to a healthy relationship with food. I think her attitude and approach are refreshing. I mean, her entire “diet” is literally: fuck it. Stop stressing so much about food. Stop trying to force your body to conform to some fucked-up wealthy white patriarchal ideal. Forget everything you’ve learned or told yourself over the years about diet, food, and what you should and shouldn’t be doing. Stop wasting time and energy obsessing about your weight and start living life to the fullest.

If you’re interested, Dooner is running an online book club starting on May 26th (you only have a few more days to enrol – enrolment ends on May 24th – so get off that fence if you’re thinking about it). This will include weekly Q&A sessions, discussion, and more. Check-out thefuckitdiet.com/club to learn more and sign-up. You can also follow Dooner on twitter and instgram @thefuckitdiet where she shares snippets from the book, quotes, and stories of her adorable dog.


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What to eat when you’re pregnant

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By now you may be aware that I’m pregnant. This is great news both personally and for more blog material – apologies if prenatal nutrition is of no interest to you. Now that the word is out, I feel comfortable sharing some of my observations.

First off, take the nutrition advice from apps with a grain of salt. These were likely not developed by registered dietitians and may not contain the greatest information. Aside from those, you might be getting your nutrition recommendations from prenatal classes which you would think would be better but I wasn’t super impressed with some of the information provided in the online class that I did (here’s hoping the in-person class is better!).

The general advice is fine: this is an important time to be getting adequate nutrition as, though technically not, the fetus is pretty damn close to a parasite. It’s going to deplete you of all of your iron and calcium stores if you don’t makes sure you’re consuming enough to replenish them. However, I took exception to some of the outdated advice I saw in the class I completed.

There’s a section on gestational diabetes which is followed-up by the section on prenatal nutrition. In this section there’s a sample meal plan which is whack for anyone, let alone a pregnant woman who is concerned about developing gestational diabetes. Highlights include breakfast: toast, oatmeal with banana, jam, and a glass of milk; snack: vanilla yoghurt and dried apricots; bedtime snack: frozen yoghurt. Hello blood sugar spikes! And I mean honestly, who eats toast and oatmeal for breakfast? Get some damn protein in there (nut butter, nuts, seeds, eggs…). And that snack, smh. Plain or no sugar-added yoghurt with berries would be a better choice or there are loads of other nutritious snack options that don’t contain sugar. I thought we’d moved past recommending frozen yoghurt like a decade ago. It’s generally higher in sugar than ice cream and not nearly as nutritious as regular un-frozen yoghurt. Which leads me to the swap suggestions.

There was a page of “if you’re craving this, try that”. Not that there was anything wrong with the suggestions (things like pretzels instead of potato chips and a grilled chicken burger instead of a regular beef burger) but I’m of the mind that you should listen to your body and give it what it wants. There is nothing wrong with having some chips or a burger when you’re pregnant, or when you’re not. And then there was that freaking frozen yoghurt again! I saw ice cream and groaned and said to my boyfriend, “how much do you want to bet they’re going to say to have froyo instead?” Wisely, not a bet he was willing to take as, of course, it was frozen yoghurt.

At one point they advised to “avoid foods with chemicals” which is meaningless and completely unhelpful advice. All food is comprised of chemicals.

I also wish that they had acknowledged the food aversions, cravings, and nausea/vomiting that many pregnant women experience. For women who are experiencing severe “morning” sickness it can be better to eat what they can stomach when they can stomach it. You can tell women to eat lots of vegetables, fish, and whole grains but if these foods aren’t going to sit well with them then that advice is not helpful. Women who require advice beyond that provided in the online class should ask their doctor for a referral to see a Registered Dietitian. Those living in Ontario can also call Telehealth Ontario at 1-866-797-0000 Monday-Friday 9-5 to speak with a RD for free.

There should also be recognition that listening to our bodies and our hunger and fullness cues is important. If you want ice cream, eat some ice cream. And if you want frozen yoghurt (to each their own), eat some froyo. Just like you’ll learn when it comes time for infant feeding, you should trust yourself and trust your tummy.


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The real cause of Type 2 Diabetes

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The other day someone I follow on Twitter shared a tweet from an MD/PhD student that said that, “excess calories causes diabetes” and that this results from ready availability of palatable food, sedentary lifestyles, and genetics. Apparently anyone who disagrees with this assertion is either trying to sell you something or wants you to think they’re smart. I scrolled back and forth a few times before deciding I really didn’t want to get into a “thing” on twitter but it really got under my skin and I just can’t let it go. I decided that blogging about it would be more productive than arguing with someone who’s already made up their mind about the motives for my disagreement without hearing why I take issue with his sweeping statement. Just to be clear: I have nothing to sell you and I’m not trying to make you think that I’m smart. I just don’t like this simplification of a complicated disease.

To begin, I am assuming that the tweeter was referring to Type 2 Diabetes, not Type 1. A little bit of a pet peeve of mine when people don’t distinguish between the two because despite leading to similar consequences they really are separate diseases with different causes and treatments.

Okay, so my problem with this doctor’s statement is really the implications that it has for people with T2D and the lack of acknowledgement of health inequities that contribute to the development of T2D. Yes, he mentions that it’s the food environment and the inactive lifestyle that is common in our society that’s the problem. This, I will admit, is a step above simply blaming people for eating too much and not exercising enough. However, the implied solution is the same for both messages: don’t eat too many calories and get off your lazy butts and you won’t get T2D. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple. For many, poverty and health inequities are at the root of many chronic diseases, including T2D.

Recent research has highlighted the relationship between the social determinants of health and chronic diseases, such as T2D. This research has shown that, “social determinants (such as income, education, housing, and access to nutritious food) are central to the development and progression of Type 2 diabetes” and, “individuals with lower income and less education are 2 to 4 times more likely to develop diabetes than more advantaged individuals”. That’s right, privilege provides greater protection against developing Type 2 Diabetes than does lifestyle “choices” while poverty greatly increases risk. Not to mention that certain racialized and ethnic groups are often touted as having greater risk for T2D even though much (if not all) of this increased risk can be attributed to inequities and racism experienced by these groups.

We need to stop thinking about T2D as the result of lifestyle choices and start thinking about it as the result of societal structures. If you have the level of privilege where you can choose to eat healthfully and be physically active that’s great and you should absolutely do so. But we need to stop pretending that it’s lifestyle “choices” that are causing this disease when many people do not have that choice.


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The dark and dirty side of cooking shows

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Oh hi. Sorry for the hiatus. I went on vacation and then I didn’t really feel like blogging. I’m still not sure that I do, to be honest. It kind of feels like an obligation. I’m much more fired-up about the Ontario budget that was released last week and the sense of impending doom accompanying the fall federal election than I am about anything nutrition. However, I have been thinking about a topic for a little while, and that’s food safety.

I was watching the Big Family Cooking Showdown on Netflix – which I highly recommend by the way, especially season two – and was disturbed by some of the lack of hygiene that I saw. There were people with long hair that wasn’t tied back, people fixing their hair and not washing their hands after, people crying and wiping their eyes and noses with their hands and then continuing to cook. Not to mention the few times when foods, including meat, were served not fully cooked. Now, these aren’t professional chefs, they’re just home cooks, but I still feel like the producers should have ensured that safe food handling practices were followed.

On a similar note, a recent study found that there is inadequate food safety information provided in many Canadian cookbooks. Considering that most cookbook authors are not food safety experts this really doesn’t come as a huge surprise. I think that either they themselves lack the food safety knowledge required to impart that information on the readers or they simply assume that these things are common knowledge. Unfortunately, given the lack of food literacy in the general population (consider the recent hullabaloo about people eating undercooked chicken fingers) I don’t think it’s safe to assume that safe food handling practices are common knowledge. To be fair, where do we think people are learning this information? Not in schools where mandatory home economics were cancelled in Ontario (and most other provinces) in the 1990s. Not at home where the majority of parents are no longer cooking meals for the family most nights of the week.

So, what’s the big deal? Why was I grossed out by the behaviours of some of the contestants on the cooking show? Why am I possibly never attending another potluck in my life? It’s because these unsafe food handling practices can make you sick. Health Canada estimates that between 11 and 13 million Canadians suffer from foodborne illness each year. The majority of these cases are linked to foods prepared at home, not from restaurants.

While I am not a food safety expert, I have completed food handler training and I regularly teach the basics at cooking classes. Here are a few of the most common unsafe food practices I see:

  • Food is left unrefrigerated for too long. This may be someone grocery shopping and leaving perishables in their car while they run other errands or people leaving leftovers out overnight. Foods that need to be refrigerated (such as meat, fish, poultry, tofu, dairy products, and prepared mixed dishes) should be refrigerated within two hours. Left out in the “danger zone” (i.e. room temperature) for longer than that can allow any bacteria present to multiply to levels that may make you sick.
  • Cross contamination. People use the same cutting board and knife for raw meat and then veggies, meat is stored on the top shelf in the fridge, hands are not washed thoroughly after handling raw meat. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat and veg or ensure that you prepare ready-to-eat foods first and cut-up your meat last. As for hand washing…
  • People don’t wash their hands often enough or thoroughly enough. I think everyone knows that they should wash their hands after they use the bathroom and before they begin preparing food. However, I see people touching their cellphones, hair, faces, pets, etc. and then continuing to cook without washing their hands. All of these things (yes, even your face and hair) are covered in bacteria that have the potential to make you sick. Always wash your hands after touching anything other than the food and cooking tools, or after handling raw meat, fish, or poultry. Proper hand washing means wetting your hands first, then lathering for about 20 seconds (make sure you get your thumbs, between your fingers, and around your nails!), rinsing, and drying your hands, and not turning off the tap with your now clean hands (use paper towel or a hand towel for this).
  • Meat is not fully cooked. Did you know that you can’t tell if meat is properly cooked just by looking? Get yourself a probe thermometer and take the temperature to ensure that it’s hot enough all the way through to have killed the bacteria. Some meat is okay to serve a pink inside (like a steak) other meat is not (like chicken or hamburger – don’t @ me).
  • Tasting the food using the stirring spoon and then continuing to use that spoon to cook. Nobody wants your slobber in their food! If you want to taste while you’re cooking (which is definitely a good idea to ensure you’re getting the seasonings right) take a clean spoon, use it to scoop up a taste, then wash that spoon.
  • Not washing raw vegetables and fruit. You don’t know where they’ve been before they made it to your kitchen. There may have been bugs and manure on them at the farm, all of the hands that have handled them from the farm to the distribution centre to the store. Think of how many people you see fondling tomatoes and putting them back, or dropping one on the grocery store floor. Do you think they all washed their hands thoroughly after using the bathroom? You don’t need those fruit and vegetable washes. Just running water and friction; rub them with your hands under the running water. Even if you’re peeling them, if you’re cutting through the peel, you should wash them first. Otherwise, anything that was on the outside will be dragged down through the inside by the knife.

It’s one thing if you want to take the risk of eating unsafe food yourself. Perhaps you won’t follow all of these rules yourself (although you really should). It’s a whole different matter when you’re making food for other people. Please heed safe food handling practices! For more on food safety checkout Fight Bac!