Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


Leave a comment

Doctors don’t know about nutrition but who could possibly teach them?

hand-wringing-intensifies

I came across this journal article in an email digest last week and I discovered that I do have enough fire left in my belly to keep blogging because holy shit y’all was it ever enraging!

The article title and abstract indicate that nutrition education is missing from the education of doctors and that doctors need this education due to the important impact of diet and nutrition on health and in many disease states. No argument here. However, they then go on to say, “Without properly trained trainers, we have no one to train the doctors of tomorrow. This is a “catch 22.” Okay, they must be planning to talk about how dietitians, you know that entire profession devoted to the study of nutrition, can play a role in the full text. I mean, it seems like a pretty obvious solution. But… I find the full text and there is nary a mention of dietitians in the entire article. It was then that my blood began to boil.

Is there some sort of rule that I’m unaware of that only medical doctors are qualified to teach medical students? Have the authors never heard of dietitians? The entire article is quite frankly baffling. I’m honestly appalled that the authors, one of whom appears to be a medical doctor, are incapable of such basic research as to be able to discover that there is in fact an entire regulated allied health profession devoted entirely to the study of nutrition. They’re worried that doctors don’t know about nutrition? Well, I’m worried that doctors can completed medical school without basic research skills. I’m also a little amazed that it was accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal devoted to “advances in nutrition” and no one thought “hey, hang on a sec… this is not actually a problem. Dietitians and nutrition scientists can teach these students. Maybe we can just tell them this and save them the embarrassment of publishing this drivel.” But no, apparently everyone was like, “yes. Very serious problem. Doctors need to know about nutrition but doctors don’t know enough about nutrition to teach medical students so future doctors will all continue to graduate without the foggiest understanding of human nutrition and women will continue to suffer from anemia.”

Good news: there are plenty of dietitians and nutrition scientists (not all nutrition researchers have the RD credential) who teach dietetic students who could also teach medical students about nutrition. While they’re at it they can also let them know that doctors don’t have to be experts in every area and they can in fact refer patients to dietitians when they require nutrition support.


Leave a comment

Top 10 of 2018

Easing back into (or maybe out of) blogging in the New Year with my top 10 most popular posts in 2018 (based on number of hits). Thanks for reading!

  1. Being thin is not a qualification for providing nutrition advice
  2. Are Clif Bars a healthy snack?
  3. Are pharmacists the new dietitians?
  4. Call in the food police, we’ve got another unruly body
  5. Breathing vs raw food. Should we be getting our oxygen from our diet?
  6. Whole Life Challenge review
  7. I don’t know why you say Hello (Fresh), I say goodbye
  8. Naturopaths are jumping onboard Nutrition Month and this boat ain’t big enough for all of us
  9. A smile doesn’t hide your weight bias
  10. To keto or not to keto


2 Comments

What obesity and homosexuality have in common

struggling-to-find-a-weight-loss-program-that-really-works-QWQ8j

A couple of weeks ago I was listening to an episode of Radiolab on which they shared an episode of the short podcast series Unerased titled: Dr Davison and the Gay Cure. They were talking about the former perception of homosexuality as a disorder and the rise of conversion therapy. As I was listening what they were saying really struck a chord with me. I found myself thinking “this is exactly how people are going to think about weight loss counselling one day”.

On the podcast, they were saying, essentially, it doesn’t matter if people come to us wanting to change. What does it actually mean to help them? “The problem that these people are asking us to solve is a problem we created. That we labeled as a problem.” Even if we could effect certain changes, there is the more important question as to whether we should… It makes no difference how successful the treatment is, it is immoral.” And I was like “YES, this exact same thing could be said about weight loss treatment!”

This belief in relation to homosexuality was considered to be fringe and most people weren’t in support of it initially. This parallels the Health at Every Size/body diversity/weight acceptance movement. There is a lot of push-back from people in the medical community and the general public when it’s suggested that weight is not a condition that needs to be treated. Just as with the acceptance of homosexuality as a normal state, there were a few outspoken pioneers leading the movement and with time, it became more accepted by the mainstream. I feel that this is beginning to happen now with weight. More of us RDs who were always taught that “overweight” and “obesity” are unhealthy are coming to realize that people can be healthy at many different sizes.

Of course, there are still hold-outs and there is still conversion therapy happening in some places. Similarly, there will likely continue to be hold-outs who believe that only thin people can be healthy and that BMI is indicative of health. However, I’m hopeful that we’re reaching a turning point and that one day the medical community will agree that weight is not a “problem” and that weight loss treatments are unethical.


4 Comments

Top 10 Holiday Survival Tips

0e6a11fa7afd21cdf147ccc8fc8b0595f509000c6db4a0f0958deb478f9e15b4

It’s that time of year when food is abundant, there is a seemingly never ending succession of holiday parties and events, all of which feature food. It’s also that time of year when you start to see a proliferation of articles about the average weight gain over the holidays and how you can save yourself from looking like the poor unfortunate headless woman in the photo by preloading your purse with celery sticks and doing 20 burpees every time you take a drink of rum and eggnog. This is not one of those lists.

The holidays should be fun. A time to connect with family and friends, have a reprieve from work, and yes, even eat delicious baked goods. If the holidays for you are a time to feel full of chocolate and regret, a time filled with anxiety about all of the “bad” food you’re going to be faced with, then these 10 tips should help get you through the holiday season without guilt.

  1. Stop imbuing food with moral value. There are no good or bad foods and you are not good or bad for eating certain foods.
  2. Don’t feel guilty for enjoying delicious foods or for eating food for reasons other than hunger.
  3. Don’t confuse the number on the scale with your personal worth or a measure of your health. Consider not weighing yourself.
  4. Ignore or call-out people who make judgemental comments about what you are (or aren’t) eating. Try to focus on your internal cues when deciding whether or not to eat or what to eat. It’s nobody else’s business what you put on your plate.
  5. Don’t let food-pushers pressure you into eating things you don’t want to eat. Conversely, if you’re someone who tends to show their love by pushing food on people please consider that someone declining your offer of food is not a reflection of their feelings toward you. Try just putting food out and not pressuring anyone to eat it.
  6. Don’t make a New Year’s resolution to lose weight/eat healthy/go on a diet.
  7. Wear clothes that make you comfortable and happy.
  8. Remember to nourish your body. Yes, it’s okay to eat cookies and chocolate but you won’t feel at your best if you’re eating these foods exclusively.
  9. Don’t read (other) articles about “surviving” the holidays.
  10. If you’re struggling with body acceptance, don’t feel like you have to go through it alone. Find a Registered Dietitian who specializes in a HAES or weight-neutral approach.


6 Comments

Are calories an enemy?

Screen Shot 2018-11-17 at 3.55.30 PM.png

I would like to propose that we stop demonizing calories. All too often I see products promoted as “low-calorie” or “calorie-free”. I hear jokes about things like it’s okay to eat a broken cookie because the calories all leak out. Consuming as few calories as possible is considered virtuous. This despite the fact that we need calories to live.

Just in case you need a quick refresher on calories, despite what many people will have you believe, a calorie is a calorie. The definition of a calorie is, “the heat energy required to raise the temperature of one kilogram (rather than a gram) of water by one degree Celsius”. Calories provide us with energy. Energy to get through each day but also energy for your body’s systems and cells to function. Without a source of calories you will die.

So, why do we think that calories are bad and something to avoid? Because we’ve learned that excess calories, those we don’t use up, are often stored by our bodies for later use in the form of fat. And fat is bad because our society has rather arbitrarily decided that being thin is more attractive. Regardless of your body shape or size though your body still needs calories to function.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we lived in a world and mental space where instead of choosing 100 calorie snacks or avoiding foods because they contain “too many calories” we could look at food as a pleasurable way to nourish our bodies? Not just to think of food as fuel but as an essential component of self-care. Calories are not the enemy, they are vital to life.