Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

Of mice and omegas

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Apparently the anti-omega-3 supplement trend is continuing. The latest piece of research comes from BC and shows that, in combination, omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may be increasing inflammation in the body. The study concluded that omega-3 supplementation could be increasing gastrointestinal distress in the elderly. According to a news article quoting the lead author, “levels of omega 6 are so high in our bodies that any more unsaturated fatty acid — even omega 3, despite its health benefits — will actually contribute to the negative effects omega 6 PUFA have on the heart and gut”.

I don’t dispute the likelihood that many of us are now consuming too much omega-6. However, this study is not affecting my decision to take omega-3 supplements. As a dietitian, I know that it’s better to get my nutrients from food and I should be eating more fish. Because I don’t eat as much fish as I should, I take an omega-3 supplement.

Why isn’t this study influencing my decision to pop an omega-3 supplement every second day? Well, the study was done on mice and recent evidence shows that mice studies may not be the best models for humans. In addition, the mice were fed a high fat diet (40% of total calories) with fat coming from canola oil and corn oil, with some mice being given fish oil as well. From where I sit, this is not much of an approximation of my fat consumption and I’m sure that applies to many of you as well. I get fat from olive oil, butter, dairy products (especially yoghurt and cheese), nuts and nut butters, coconut oil, eggs, etc. Very little of my fat intake comes from canola or corn oil. In addition, 40% is quite a high intake of calories from fat – the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution (AMDR) for fat is 20-35% of total calories.

If you are consuming all (or most) of your fat from canola and corn oil and you’re eating a high-fat diet (and if you’re a mouse) then perhaps this study should give you pause before you decide to start taking an omega-3 supplement. However, I think that you should be more concerned about the excessive consumption of a limited variety of fats than you should be about adding omega-3 PUFAs to the mix.

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Author: Diana

I'm a registered dietitian from Nova Scotia, living and working in Ontario, Canada. My goal is to help people relearn how to have a healthy relationship with food.

2 thoughts on “Of mice and omegas

  1. Pingback: From mice and CGA to humans and coffee: I won’t be forsaking my Bodum just yet | bite my words

  2. Pingback: Fat does not equal fat | bite my words

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