Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

Strong bones

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Last week a US government advisory group announced that there is no benefit for healthy “older” women to take low-dose calcium or vitamin D supplements. These conclusions were based on findings that these supplements do not appear to reduce the risk of broken bones.

There are a few important things to note about this pronouncement: 1. This message applies only to healthy older women. Women who are suffering from certain illnesses may require more of some nutrients and should consult with their doctor before stopping (or starting) any supplement regimen. 2. The advisory group did not look at higher supplement doses. There may be benefits (or risks) to consuming higher supplemental doses. 3. The announcement was based on risk of broken bones in comparison to risk of kidney stones. The advisory group did not look at any benefits of supplementation other than bone health. There may be additional benefits to vitamin D supplementation (again, or risks) we just don’t have sufficient research to advise on this basis yet.

I think that the most important lesson we can take away from this study is that many illnesses that befall us when we’re elderly are a result of exposures and lifestyle during our youth. As I remember learning in school: osteoporosis is a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences. We can’t mistreat or neglect our bodies when we’re young and then expect to make up for it when we’re elderly. To ensure strong healthy bones as seniors we need to ensure that children and young adults consume healthy balanced diets; including adequate vitamin D (which may require supplementation) and calcium. Children also need to engage in regular physical activity and we need to continue to exercise throughout our lives to maintain muscle mass and strong bones.

While it’s never too late to start leading a healthy life, it’s also never too early.


Author: Diana

I'm a registered dietitian from Nova Scotia, living and working in Ontario, Canada. My goal is to help people relearn how to have a healthy relationship with food.

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