Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

BANT Ill-being Guidelines

2 Comments

IMG_3828

A dietitian in the UK was questioning BANT about the new “Wellbeing Guidelines” they had posted last week. One of the most significant issues being the use of a skull and crossbones to denote foods that should be avoided. These foods being: Artificial sweeteners, Fizzy/sugary drinks, Alcohol, Pasta, bread, sweets, cakes & biscuits, Dried fruits and fruit juices, Eating between meals, Ready and processed meals (emphasis mine). BANT tried to justify this by saying that these particular guidelines don’t apply to everyone, just the people who are overweight or obese. They actually titled these guidelines “Fight the Fat – Beat the Bloat“. As if it somehow makes it better that “only” those who need to lose weight are being told that these foods are essentially poison. Because we all know that fear mongering and making people feel guilty about their food choices leads to weight loss, SIGH. And never mind that the majority of the population is classified as overweight or obese.

Sure, most of the foods to avoid are ones that people (no matter their weight) should limit. Oddly enough, there’s no skull and crossbones nor mention of foods to avoid on the guidelines for people who aren’t trying to lose weight (just a note to limit refined grains). Which is silly because healthy eating is healthy eating no matter what your weight and attaching a stigma to food for people who are trying to lose weight doesn’t exactly promote a healthy relationship with food.

The other significant oddity about these guidelines is the fact that those trying to lose weight are told to limit their consumption of fruit to no more than one serving a day while the general guidelines tell people to eat 1-3 servings of fruit a day. While I have known people who have consumed fruit to excess this is pretty rare and in any event, 1-3 servings is certainly not excessive.

While these are issues with all of the government issued nutrition guidelines that I’m aware of, these guidelines are not an improvement. Shaming people about food doesn’t promote wellness.

Advertisements

Author: Diana

I'm a registered dietitian from Nova Scotia, living and working in Ontario, Canada. My goal is to help people relearn how to have a healthy relationship with food.

2 thoughts on “BANT Ill-being Guidelines

  1. Not sure want BANT stands for but I will assume it is similar to the American Dietary Guidelines. SIGH so not encouraging as why make food poison but rather talk about portion size and moderation (choose whole grain pasta over the old traditional “white” pasta, ect.) :(
    P.S. – enjoy reading your articles

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s