Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

Should Canada take a page out of the Brazilian Food Guide?

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Examples of Brazilian lunches from the Dietary Guidelines for the Brazilian Population used under a Creative Commons Licence.

I was reading this article about The best and worst nutritional advice from around the world today (yesterday if you’re reading this on the day it’s posted, but that’s neither here nor there) and the criticism of Canada’s Food Guide got under my skin.

If you’ve been with me for a while then you’ll know that I’m no great fan of our Food Guide. However, it doesn’t feature chocolate milk or pudding. In fact, it doesn’t mention them at all. There is an accompanying site from Health Canada called My Food Guide. This interactive tool allows you to personalise the guide by inputting your age and sex and selecting from lists of foods that you enjoy. Chocolate milk and pudding are a couple of the foods included on the milk and alternatives list. Unfortunate, certainly. I’d still argue that they’re not present on Canada’s Food Guide, let alone “featured”. In my mind this is Canada’s Food Guide:

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What do you think? Is the print version of Canada’s Food Guide The Food Guide or does the online interactive My Food Guide constitute Canada’s Food Guide? Maybe it’s just semantics.

This all lead me to think more about the comparisons of the various food guides and I don’t really think that they’re fair comparisons. I’m not even sure how valid the criticisms of the “worst” guides are. Is it really so terrible that the Italian food guide includes things like salami and biscuits? I think it’s good that they’re providing recognition of realistic eating patterns and including foods that can be part of a healthy diet. As long as the intent and interpretation don’t lead people to believe that the Italian government is recommending that people eat more cured meat and cookies.

The criticism of the Japanese food guide is that grains are recommended as the foundation of the diet. Again, not necessarily a terrible recommendation. We need to acknowledge that there are cultural differences and that there is no definitive “right” or “wrong” diet. Grains can be the foundation of a healthy diet. In Canada when I was a kid the Food Guide actually featured grains as the dominant colour in the rainbow. This was switched to vegetables and fruit because they provide us with more nutrients for fewer calories as obesity became a growing concern in our country. This doesn’t mean that a healthy diet can’t contain plenty of grains, this was just an easy switch to make on the food guide to encourage weight loss. Not that it’s made an iota of difference.

Okay, so the “worst” advice isn’t really all that terrible. How great is the “best”? It is pretty great. From a professional standpoint. The Brazilian guidelines are 80 pages. The Swedish are 26. Both documents are very thorough and take a whole food approach rather than focussing on single nutrients. Excellent but not exactly something that you can easily handout to a patient or client or stick to the fridge.

Considering that about half of our population struggles with low literacy, how useful would it be for us to have an 80 page food guide? Even if people could read it I’m highly doubtful that many would. I copied and pasted some of the text from the Brazilian guide into Hemmingway app and it came up at a grade 15 level! That’s not exactly easy reading.

Yes, our Canadian Food Guide could certainly use a make-over. We could take a page from Brazil. I don’t know about all 80 though. Comparing it to these lengthy documents is like comparing apples to oranges or chocolate milk to plain kefir.

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Author: Diana

I'm a registered dietitian from Nova Scotia, living and working in Ontario, Canada. My goal is to help people relearn how to have a healthy relationship with food.

2 thoughts on “Should Canada take a page out of the Brazilian Food Guide?

  1. Does that infographic say margarine? I thought margarine was basically packaged trans-fat.
    Is it actually not that bad or did I miss something?

    Like

    • It does. A bit of a contentious issue among RDs whether or not to recommend marg or butter. However, the majority of margarines (soft tub) are trans-fat free. It’s the old solid block margarines that contain trans-fats.

      Like

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