Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

Should dietitians use #eatclean on social media?

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clean-eating

A friend shared this article with me last month. For those of you who can’t be bothered to click links or belong to the TL;DR camp (of which, I’ll admit, I’m a frequent member) let me give you the briefest of synopses. It was about clean eating, why people got so sucked in by the notion, and why it won’t freaking die already.

Reading about all of the self-appointed “clean eating” wellness gurus got me thinking about how many of us who rail against fad diets are also inadvertently complicit in keeping them alive. I see lots of well-intentioned dietitians using hashtags like #cleaneating and #eatclean on their Instagram posts. Personally, I prefer the tag #eatdirty although I don’t think it garners me as many likes as it hasn’t quite caught on in the way that I had hoped. Anyhow… I’m not here to judge my fellow RDs. I’m not even sure how I feel about this myself.

There’s a part of me that thinks it’s good for dietitians to be appropriating the “eat clean” hashtag. By doing so, perhaps they’re reaching people who are all-in on the trendy diet train but who might benefit from seeing sensible nutrition and food suggestions from a nutrition professional. On the other hand, is using these hashtags on Instagram lending legitimacy to them? Isn’t it possible that by using the hashtags, no matter the content, it’s implying that the RD posting supports the notion of clean eating? And for all I know, maybe they do, not all of us are on the same page. But let’s assume that they’re using it, not because they believe in “eating clean” (which means nothing by the way), and not because they’re just trying to get more likes (I know, terribly cynical of me), but because they want to show people who are into “clean eating” a more balanced way of approaching food. Is it cool for dietitians to be using the hashtags for this purpose? Even if it means that it lends an air of legitimacy to a silly fad diet. Does the end justify the means? Or would it be better if we risked only preaching to the choir by using hashtags that truly represent our personal philosophies toward food and our professional opinions?

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Author: Diana

I'm a registered dietitian from Nova Scotia, living and working in Ontario, Canada. My goal is to help people relearn how to have a healthy relationship with food.

2 thoughts on “Should dietitians use #eatclean on social media?

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