Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

Game Fuel won’t help you up your game

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Okay, I’m a little bit behind the times I guess because I only just found out about this “Game Fuel” drink from Mountain Dew (shout-out to my friend Zach for alerting me to this product) last week even though it’s been on the market since December. I suppose I’m not exactly part of their target market though as someone who doesn’t play video games or consume energy drinks. In case you, like me, hadn’t heard of this beverage before, I’m here to give you the low-down.

Lest you were thinking that “Game Fuel” was intended for those playing physical sports games, you would be (understandably) mistaken. This “fuel” was designed specifically for video gamers.

One can of Game Fuel supposedly contains two servings, but let’s be honest, who drinks only half a can of something? That one can contains 90 calories which all come from the 23 grams of sugar. That’s just shy of 6 teaspoons of sugar for those of you who don’t feel like doing the math. It would take the average gamer over an hour of playing to use up the equivalent calories to those in a can of Game Fuel. This is also the total recommended maximum daily consumption of added sugar for women and 3 teaspoons less than the max for men. I am not mentioning children and youth here because it is unsafe for them to be consuming energy drinks. Not the healthiest of beverages but what about the alleged science behind the ingredients such as caffeine, theanine, and vitamins A and B that PepsiCo claims will increase alertness and accuracy?

There is 90 mg of caffeine in a can of Game Fuel. This is on par with an average cup of coffee. Caffeine is likely the most studied ingredient in Game Fuel and there is evidence to back-up their claim that it can increase alertness. However, it is quite easy to achieve a tolerance to caffeine and once you do, it doesn’t matter how much more you consume, you will no longer reap the original benefits. Also, it’s important to note that as with most things, more is not better. Caffeine consumption greater than 400 mg/d can lead to unwanted side effects such as a fast heartbeat, insomnia, and irritability.

L-theanine is an amino acid that is found in green tea. It has been found to act synergistically with caffeine by increasing relaxation and attention without promoting drowsiness.

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin which means that it is possible to attain Vitamin A toxicity. Generally, Canadians consume adequate quantities of Vitamin A through diet alone (it’s found in a variety of plant and animal foods) and supplementation is not recommended due to the risk of toxicity. Although the amount of Vitamin A in Game Fuel is quite low (180 mcg) it is still an unwarranted ingredient. Vitamin A, in adequate amounts (700-900 mcg/d), is important in maintaining a healthy immune system, skin, eyes.

Niacin is a B Vitamin that is important in helping your body to use fat, protein, and carbohydrates as energy. One can of Game Fuel contains 6.4 mg of niacin, about half the recommended daily intake. I am genuinely baffled as to why niacin is added to Game Fuel other than as a marketing tactic. Perhaps if this was a sports drink but let’s be honest, you don’t exactly need extra vitamins to meet your needs when you’re sitting around playing video games. The same goes for the added Vitamin B6 and Pantothenic Acid.

Long story short: this is an unnecessary product designed to meet a non-existent need. You don’t need fancy energy drinks to play video games. You’re better off sticking with water. If you don’t have the energy to stay awake to keep gaming a better alternative to Game Fuel is to actually get some sleep.

 

Author: Diana

I'm a registered dietitian from Nova Scotia, living and working in Ontario, Canada. My goal is to help people relearn how to have a healthy relationship with food.

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