Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

Dietitian confessions: starting my baby on solid foods

1 Comment

IMG-2072

I haven’t written in a little while because it feels like a nutrition blog is so irrelevant when we’re in the midst of a pandemic. I also don’t want to write about anything related to the covid because self-care for me right now means not overwhelming myself with pandemic-related info. But, maybe you’re like me and you’re trying to avoid too much virtual exposure to covid-19 and you’d welcome a break with a little nutrition confessional. So, I’m here today to share with you my experience starting my baby on solid foods.

As a dietitian I’ve learned all about starting infants on solid foods. As a dietitian who works in public health I’ve even taught classes on the subject. As a lover of cooking and eating I was feeling pretty confident and excited about introducing my nugget to new flavours after six months of only ever consuming breast milk and formula. The first stumble in my plan was the fact that she wasn’t ready to start solid foods at six months.

If you’re aware of current pediatric recommendations, it’s advised that babies be fed only breast milk or formula until six months of age. I dutifully waited all that time, but babies don’t all mature at the same rate. Something that never came up when I learned about introducing solids was baby’s age versus their adjusted age. My baby was born a month early and this meant that even though she was six months old, developmentally she was more like five months. I ended up having to give her a couple of extra weeks before she was interested in and able to eat solids.

Another current recommendation is to start babies on iron-rich foods and once they’re consuming them regularly then you can introduce other foods. These foods include: meats, egg yolk, beans, lentils, and fortified baby cereal. I was confident that I was going to feed my baby whole foods, that fortified cereal was an old-school first food. Ha ha ha. My baby had other ideas. She was uninterested in my concoction of puréed chickpeas mixed with pumped milk. She was displeased with puréed hardboiled egg. And she was absolutely appalled by the jarred chicken baby food I bought in a desperate attempt to get her to eat something from that list of iron-rich foods (see photo above). Honestly, I couldn’t blame her – have you ever tried chicken baby food?? Finally, I abandoned my smug plan and fed her some iron-fortified baby oat cereal which she ate but with little enthusiasm. I made her strained green peas, which were a pain in the ass to make and which she rejected. I moved on to offering her some foods that weren’t iron-rich (gasp) but were possibly more palatable: banana (acceptable), avocado (no thank you), and sweet potato (could not get enough). I managed to get some iron in her through a combination of mixing these foods with baby cereal or with sweet potato.

I had also envisioned making her baby food myself, after all, she should quickly advance from purées to soft whole foods according to everything I’d read. It turns out that it’s pretty much impossible to get super small quantities of food smooth in my food processor. It also turns out that she wasn’t ready to try different textures for nearly two months. So, I bought ready made baby food packets from the grocery store and supplemented with baby cereal and easy to purée foods like sweet potato, butternut squash, and banana. This was an easier way for me to introduce a variety of new foods to her without ending up with a freezer full of puréed food.

She’s now advanced to consuming a mix of commercial baby food, homemade baby food (like tiny baby pancakes and muffins) and modified foods that we’re eating like puréed dal or mashed pasta. Despite what many people believe, babies don’t have to eat bland food. Yes, it’s great to let them taste unadulterated foods so that they experience the different flavours of whole foods but they can also handle herbs and spices and these are also important flavours to expose them to.

If you’re a new parent starting your baby out on solids there can be a lot of pressure to do this in a certain way. I see so many blogs with these elaborate baby meals and that’s awesome if you have time and money and your baby is interested in these foods but you are not failing as a parent if you’re feeding your baby infant cereal or food from a jar or squeeze pouch. As long as your baby is experiencing new flavours, and then new textures, then you’re doing just fine.

Author: Diana

I'm a registered dietitian from Nova Scotia, living and working in Ontario, Canada. My goal is to help people relearn how to have a healthy relationship with food.

One thought on “Dietitian confessions: starting my baby on solid foods

  1. Well welcome to the wonderful world if child rearing, :) Probably the best and worse aspect of being a woman – such ultimate joy and debilitating heartbreak. No matter what we love our children, ha! Congratulations on such a sweet child, you are so blessed, <3

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s