Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving

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Does protecting the public infringe on freedom of speech?

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So, I already blogged about a very similar issue not all that long ago, but I can’t let this article pass without comment.

Essentially people (aka business owners who are hiring unqualified individuals) are pissed off because they won’t be able to hire just anybody to provide nutrition counselling to customers and clients if a NY bill passes. Which means they might actually have to hire qualified nutrition professionals (aka Registered Dietitians) and maybe pay them a semi-decent salary if they want to continue offering nutrition counsel to their clientele.

The bill would define the practice of dietitians and nutritionists and make it illegal for anyone to provide these nutrition services who’s not licenced by the State to practice either dietetics or medicine. The example the article provides to make their case that this is outrageous, in my opinion, actually serves to exemplify precisely why this bill would be a good thing.

The representative of the group attempting to defeat the bill complained that someone who’s not licenced to provide nutrition services would be able to say, “for example, “Fish contains vitamin B12.” But you could not go further to say, “If you’re feeling tired, or lack energy, try foods or supplementing with vitamin B12.”” You see, a RD would know better than to give a recommendation like this because it’s not our job to diagnose. Rather, we might suggest that a person bring their concern to their doctor and ask about having their vitamin B12 level checked. There can be many reasons why an individual is lacking energy and we wouldn’t just push a supplement on someone. I can see why health food store owners might not want to hire us as pushing supplements is what keeps them in business.

Again, what the article fails to mention is the reason for the bill. It’s not for the benefit of Registered Dietitians, although it would likely benefit RDs practicing in NY. No, it’s to protect the public. It’s to ensure that unscrupulous and/or inadequately trained individuals aren’t providing nutrition services to the unwitting public (although there are plenty of exemptions). It’s so that the public aren’t provided unhelpful, or even potentially harmful nutrition advice. It’s so that the public aren’t pushed to buy unnecessary, or even potentially harmful supplements. It’s so that the public aren’t encouraged to follow unhelpful, or even potentially harmful diets. It’s so that the public don’t have to navigate the confusing titles to determine if a professional is qualified to provide them with advice. This bill would serve to ensure that the public is receiving nutrition services from qualified credible regulated professionals.



Why do we care how much Trump weighs?

recursive donald trump via giphy

I know that we all want to clutch onto every piece of evidence we find that Trump is a despicable human, hold them close, let them keep us warm at night, and build bomb shelters from them. I also know that society and popular media have taught us that “fat people” are the villains. That they are lazy and gluttonous and deserving of scorn. It’s incredibly difficult to set aside these biases, especially when we want to believe these things of a person, but that’s exactly what we need to do. Trump has given us ample reasons to believe that he is a garbage human. His objectification of and assaults on women, his racist comments and travel bans, his mockery of people with disabilities, his complete and utter lack of diplomacy, and on and on. His weight is not one of them.

Weight does not reflect ones value as a human. This is true of you, of me, of your friends and family, of famous actresses, of poor people and rich people, and yes, even of Donald Trump.
We don’t get to say that body acceptance is important and that weight is not indicative of health or personal worth for people that we like and then go around making a big deal about Trump’s weight. Sorry but not judging a person based on their weight should apply to everyone, even people we dislike.


The case for breaking up healthy eating and physical activity


Have you ever noticed that healthy eating and physical activity are often lumped together? I’ve worked on Healthy Eating Physical Activity (HEPA) teams and seen Healthy Eating Active Living (HEAL) strategies and Healthy Eating Active Fun (HEAF) programs. If you haven’t already noticed it, you probably will now that I’ve introduced that thought to your brain. The thing that I’ve been wondering lately is “why”? At what point did someone say, “hey, let’s lump these two health behaviours together”? And what was the reason for that?

On the face of it, if you’re thinking about healthy eating and physical activity purely from a weight management standpoint it seems to make sense. Most people trying to lose weight will incorporate some sort of combination of the two. Although there are people who will argue that one of the two is more important than the other, but generally in our minds they’re linked. But does it really make sense? I don’t actually think that it does.

On the one hand, you’ve got a health behaviour that involves choosing, preparing, and ingesting food. On the other hand, you’ve got a health behaviour that involves moving your body. These are not two sides of the same coin. They are two completely separate coins. Yes, they both have positive effects on our health and they can both contribute to reduced risk of certain chronic diseases and conditions. However, they are completely independent activities. You can absolutely eat a terrible diet and exercise regularly. You can also eat a super healthy diet and be highly sedentary. If you really wanted to lump health behaviours together why not pair healthy eating and alcohol consumption? Those make far more sense together than physical activity and healthy eating do.

I think that putting physical activity and healthy eating together all the time diminishes the importance of both these activities. It implies that neither is important enough to focus on, on its own. Allowing organizations and those in healthcare and related industries to focus their efforts on one over the other or to spread time thinly across the two. I think it may also help to perpetuate the notion that these behaviours are only important for weight management. When you hear about the two together, what first comes to mind? Is it enjoying a healthy life or is it a certain degree of torment undertaken to stave off obesity?

It’s time for physical activity and healthy eating to break-up. This relationship isn’t healthy and it’s affecting everyone around it. We need to recognize that these behaviours don’t necessarily go hand in hand and that they each have things to offer. If we actually start to value healthy eating and physical activity independently for their own strengths we might be able to improve our own individual relationships with both of these behaviours.

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Why you shouldn’t eat like an athlete


Aside from a sort of general curiosity I don’t see the point of articles about the diets of elite athletes. Honestly, I think sharing them as if they’re nutrition tips for the masses is potentially harmful. Unless you’re a professional athlete yourself, which the vast majority of us are not, most of their nutrition advice is not going to translate to your life. You’re probably not burning 10, 000 calories a day and I’m sorry but an hour at the gym is not comparable to the rigorous training that professional athletes undertake.

It also seems to me that many athletes undertake questionable dietary regimens (ahem, Tom Brady) in the hopes of being the best of the best. The article I linked to above has some fairly benign advice but there are loads of athletes that are following bizarre advice in an effort to hack their genes and optimize performance. When your career depends on it, it’s kind of understandable that you’d be willing to try something a little extreme. The danger lies in attributing your success to drinking alkaline water or avoiding mushrooms and encouraging us common folk to jump on your nutrition bandwagon.

The dietary needs of athletes also vary significantly depending on their sport, as well as their sex and size. The perfect diet for a marathoner is going to be quite different from the perfect diet for a shot putter. You can’t just assume that what works for one athlete nutritionally will work for another. Even more so, you can’t assume that what works for a pro athlete (or for anyone else for that matter) is going to work for you. In fact, if you tried to eat like most professional athletes you’d probably be consuming significantly more food than you need.

Go ahead and be amazed by the number of calories consumed by athletes in the Tour de France. Indulge your natural curiosity by reading about Michael Phelp’s massive training diet and other wild diets of athletes. Just don’t try these at home.