Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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The irony of #fatlogic

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A few days after my post about the insanity of some government workplace “wellness” initiatives I noticed that I was getting a lot of traffic from a subreddit. Out of curiosity (yes, I never learned from the cat’s misfortune) I clicked on the link to see what it was all about. I discovered a whole little world that I never knew existed. Something called “fatlogic”. Maybe I’m out of the loop (it’s been known to happen) but I’d never heard of fatlogic before.

As far as I can tell this fatlogic is basically the opposite of HAES (Health at Every Size). People who ascribe to this position seem to think that fat shaming is an acceptable way to “encourage” people to lose weight. It’s not just thin people who think this way, there seem to be a number of people who are overweight, or who were overweight, who are staunchly opposed to the notion that people can be healthy and overweight and believe that insulting people who are overweight (or who advocate for HAES) is appropriate.

It was nice of this group to keep their insults to themselves (i.e. voicing them on reddit rather than in the comments on my blog). I was pretty amazed at the vitriol of many of the members of the group. According to them, I clearly had no idea what I was talking about and was a brainwashed moron for believing that weight is not the best indicator of health. The subreddit also went off on a little tangent from what my primary point was. Everyone became fixated on my comments about BMI not being a very good measure of body fat. Herein is one of the clear flaws of their logic. I mean, besides the fact that it’s ignorant and discriminatory. One person mentioned that BMI is a measure of body fat, interpreting that a BMI of 18.5 equates to 18.5% body fat, below which one would be classified as “underweight” according to the BMI. The thing is, BMI doesn’t measure body fat. That 18.5 is not a percent; it’s technically kg/m2. BMI is a body mass index intended to classify people as underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese based on ranges of this index. Someone with a BMI of 18.5 could have 8% body fat or 30% body fat. This is one of the reasons why BMI is widely considered to be an inaccurate tool for measuring weight (and health). You could be very fit and lean and have the same BMI as someone who leads a sedentary lifestyle and has a significantly higher percentage of body fat.

I know that it goes against the basic tenets of the Internet but wouldn’t it be nice if people actually knew what they were talking about before they attacked others? Ever notice how it’s generally those who are the most vocal who know the least?


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Fat does not equal fat

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The article: Anyone Silly Enough to Think Fat is Good for You Needs to See This Brain Study made me want to scream and scarf a bag of potato chips out of spite.

The article reports that the study found that body fat doesn’t just sit around your midsection, it also affects your cognitive function. This lead them to the conclusion that recent reports that dietary fat has been wrongly demonized are incorrect.

What’s my problem with this? One, body fat and dietary fat are not the same! You can become obese by consuming too many fat-free foods. Dietary fat does not equal body fat. The study was looking at  body fat not dietary fat. This means that we can’t go blaming butter. Two, the study was done on mice. Mice are not humansYes, it’s quite likely that excess body fat has negative effects on many aspects of your system. However, we can’t make the leap from a study on mice to humans. And we most certainly can’t make the leap to dietary sources of fat.


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Not so sweet sweat

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I was struggling for blogspiration this week. Fortunately a friend and fellow dietitian came through by sharing this post about Sweet Sweat with me.

This product purportedly encourages localized fat-loss during exercise. The post claims that if you touch an area of your body with little or no fat that it will be much warmer to the touch than an area of the body with “stubborn fat”. This difference (which I’m not buying – my tummy feels warmer than my arm) is attributed to the “fact” that there is less circulation to the area of your body with the greater amount of fat. Supposedly, applying Sweet Sweat to your troublesome areas before a workout will increased the circulation to the area and thus the fat will pretty much melt away.

What are the magical ingredients in Sweet Sweat? Their website doesn’t say. It doesn’t really matter anyway. Lotion or no lotion, you can’t target specific areas of your body to reduce fat. If you want to know the truth about exercise and health you should read The Cure for Everything by Tim Caulfield and  Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights by Alex Hutchinson. The short of it is that you can’t control which areas of your body to lose fat from when you’re working out. The harder you exercise, and the healthier a diet you consume, the more likely you are to achieve the results you want. Sweet Sweat is not going to help you reach your fitness goals.