Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Is mom the TA for calling out her sister for buying her daughter a food scale?

I don’t have much to blog about lately. All of my usual sources of inspiration have been dominated by covid-19 for the past few months. My life revolves around my baby and we don’t go anywhere. I can’t even glean inspiration from the grocery store because I haven’t been there in over 10 weeks (11 weeks? I’ve lost count). I pretty much only check Twitter now to read posts from AITA (am I the asshole?) and Reddit relationships because it’s otherwise just an unending torrent of horror and frustration. So, I’ve now reached the stage of social isolation where I start to write about AITA posts. The one above really stuck with me.

Obviously the mom is TA (the asshole), as is the aunt. I started out on the mom’s side. Of course I would be super pissed if I had a teenaged daughter and someone bought her a food scale so that she can weigh everything she’s eating. And I 100% love the messaging that she can be healthy regardless of body size, not tying self-worth up with what her body looks like, and engaging in physical activities that she enjoys, not as a means to lose weight. However, I think both the mom and the aunt are giving the poor girl messages that are likely to lead to an unhealthy relationship with food and her body.

In the comments the mother says that she only cooks three kinds of vegetables, and only sometimes, because no one in their family likes vegetables. She states that they’re healthy but her comments indicate that the household engages in very little physical activity and doesn’t eat a balanced diet. She seems to be under the misguided impression that just because she’s preparing meals at home that they are de facto nutritious. Obviously, if she’s not including vegetables or fruit at every meal then they are nutritionally lacking (the current recommendation from Health Canada is to make half your plate vegetables and fruit). She also seems to think that vigorous exercise is unhealthy as she expressed concern that her daughter was sweating and out of breath from her home workouts. The current physical activity guidelines for children and youth (ages 5-17) start with a recommendation to “sweat” by accumulating at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity a day.

I think it’s extremely sad that the mother would discourage her daughter from engaging in physical activity and prevent her from eating a healthy diet. Let’s not let the aunt off the hook either though. Given the mother’s strange perception of what’s healthy and unhealthy I’m not sure that we can trust her assessment that the aunt has an unhealthy relationship with food and exercise. Whether she does or not, it was completely inappropriate for her to provide a 14 year old child with a scale to portion her food. Teenagers are growing rapidly and need sufficient calories and nutrients to support this growth. In addition, if she is weighing her food, the daughter is not learning to trust her own hunger and satiety cues. Teaching her that food is something to be restricted to attain a certain body size is only going to lead to longterm hang-ups when it comes to food.

Both the mother and the aunt are pushing their own agendas on this girl. If they truly had her best interests at heart they would support her efforts to eat a healthier diet and to safely engage in physical activity. Ideally, the mother would lead by example by role modelling a positive relationship with food, physical activity, and her body, but if she can’t bring herself to eat a green vegetable, the very least she can do is to provide them to her daughter as she’s asking.


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What bothered me about Lizzo’s red bikini

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An article I kept seeing popping up in my Twitter feed over the past few days was titled “Lizzo rocks tiny red bikini while on vacation in Brazil” and was accompanied by a couple of photos of Lizzo on a beach wearing a red bikini. And while part of me was like, “good for her” and was pleasantly surprised to see a positive headline there was another part of me that felt really uncomfortable about the whole thing. I spent altogether too much time trying to figure out exactly what about it made me uncomfortable. No, it wasn’t that she was wearing a bikini, I wear a bikini when I go to the beach and I have no problem with other people wearing bikinis, I’m not a total prude.

My problem with it is, that I don’t think it’s cool for us to be publicly judging people’s bodies, regardless of their size, and regardless of whether or not that judgement is positive or negative. I hate seeing those magazines at the grocery store checkouts that are plastered with paparazzi shots of famous people on beaches and are either commenting on their cellulite or their hotness. Just because someone is famous that doesn’t mean their bodies belong to the public domain. It doesn’t mean that they’ve granted us permission to share photos of them during their personal time and pass judgement on them. And just because those judgements happen to be fat-positive it doesn’t make them any more acceptable. Yes, it’s great that Lizzo is confident and is a positive role model but that doesn’t make it okay for us to intrude on her personal vacation and it doesn’t make it okay for us to comment on her body. Frankly, other people’s bodies are none of our business.


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What obesity and homosexuality have in common

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A couple of weeks ago I was listening to an episode of Radiolab on which they shared an episode of the short podcast series Unerased titled: Dr Davison and the Gay Cure. They were talking about the former perception of homosexuality as a disorder and the rise of conversion therapy. As I was listening what they were saying really struck a chord with me. I found myself thinking “this is exactly how people are going to think about weight loss counselling one day”.

On the podcast, they were saying, essentially, it doesn’t matter if people come to us wanting to change. What does it actually mean to help them? “The problem that these people are asking us to solve is a problem we created. That we labeled as a problem.” Even if we could effect certain changes, there is the more important question as to whether we should… It makes no difference how successful the treatment is, it is immoral.” And I was like “YES, this exact same thing could be said about weight loss treatment!”

This belief in relation to homosexuality was considered to be fringe and most people weren’t in support of it initially. This parallels the Health at Every Size/body diversity/weight acceptance movement. There is a lot of push-back from people in the medical community and the general public when it’s suggested that weight is not a condition that needs to be treated. Just as with the acceptance of homosexuality as a normal state, there were a few outspoken pioneers leading the movement and with time, it became more accepted by the mainstream. I feel that this is beginning to happen now with weight. More of us RDs who were always taught that “overweight” and “obesity” are unhealthy are coming to realize that people can be healthy at many different sizes.

Of course, there are still hold-outs and there is still conversion therapy happening in some places. Similarly, there will likely continue to be hold-outs who believe that only thin people can be healthy and that BMI is indicative of health. However, I’m hopeful that we’re reaching a turning point and that one day the medical community will agree that weight is not a “problem” and that weight loss treatments are unethical.


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Response to: The Rise of the Anti-Diet Movement: Is it No Longer P.C. to Want to Lose Weight?

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Someone I follow on twitter recently shared this blog post: The Rise of the Anti-Diet Movement: Is it No Longer P.C. to Want to Lose Weight? by another dietitian, Janet Helm. In the post she mused about dietitians promoting themselves as “non-diet” and what this might say about other dietitians. She agreed with many points made by dietitians, quoted in RD/writer Cara Rosenbloom’s recent excellent piece for the Washington Post about non-diet dietitians, but seemed unwilling to go so far as to embrace the philosophy herself. She ended her post with the following questions: “Can’t we all get along? Can’t intuitive eating and body positivity coexist with losing weight?  Why must we line up on two sides?  Why the conflict?” I’m going to do my best to respond to these questions.

First, I too have asked that same question: “Can’t we all get along?” at times. Remember craisingate? Personally, I don’t think that as dietitians we have to agree on everything. It’s okay for us to have different perspectives and approaches. Also, in the case of diet vs non-diet, I don’t see it as an issue of getting along. Maybe I’m blissfully unaware, but I haven’t seen any “non-diet” dietitians attacking other dietitians for promoting weight management. I don’t see dietitians referring to themselves as “non-diet” as lining up on an opposing side or creating conflict. Rather, I see this identification as a way for dietitians to let prospective clients know that they do not promote weight loss as a goal. In a profession which so many believe our sole mission is to help people lose weight I think that it’s necessary for RDs who do not promote weight loss diets to make this clear up-front. I don’t believe the intent is to pass judgement on other dietitians who haven’t embraced the same approach, or to create a professional divide. However, I can see how a dietitian who has built a career around weight management counselling might see this new-ish movement as a personal judgement.

My friend Cheryl Strachan, aka “Sweet Spot RD” wrote an excellent blog post last week (while I was mulling over how best to respond to Janet’s post): Why I can’t help you lose weight. This heartfelt post explained why she would no longer work with clients on weight loss. Providing the current evidence on weight loss and health and the struggle she went through to reach this position. Rather than having me regurgitate all of the evidence here, I recommend you take a few minutes to go read it and then come back.

Done? Okay, great. So you’ll note that Cheryl mentions that when she studied nutrition in 2003 it was accepted without question that weight management was a significant part of being a dietitian. I can tell you that it was the same when I went back to uni to study nutrition in 2006. I’m not sure if things have changed since then. I suspect that they haven’t, at least not completely. It takes time for institutions and society to change. As a dietitian who has worked in weight management in the past I too have struggled to fully embrace health at every size. I understand why a fellow dietitian would ask: Can’t intuitive eating and body positivity coexist with losing weight? It’s an incredibly tough question and the answer is nuanced and it may not be the same for everyone.

I do believe that intuitive eating and body positivity can peacefully coexist with weight loss. However, I think that this can only be the case when weight loss is not the ultimate goal. For me, body positivity is appreciating your body as it currently exists and continuing to appreciate it if you gain weight or lose weight. It’s about treating yourself with respect and compassion and providing your body and mind with the nourishment they need. If you are doing these things with the clandestine goal of losing weight then you are doing yourself a disservice. That being said, it’s okay to want to lose weight. We live in a society that has conditioned us from a very young age to believe that being thin is important. It’s unrealistic to except this engrained belief to vanish overnight. It takes time to relearn to listen to your body and to treat it with respect when you’ve been viewing it as the enemy, a captor, keeping the real you the thin you hidden away. So, no, body positivity and weight loss can’t coexist but yes, body positivity and weight loss can coexist.

I think that as time goes on and nutrition programs update their curriculums, as old-school dietitians are more exposed to evidence regarding the harms of weight bias and weight loss diets, and the hold-outs retire, that things will change. After all, as dietitians we are supposed to provide evidence-based best practice and the evidence against weight loss diets is mounting. Eventually there will be no non-diet dietitians because that will be the approach we all take.