Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Should we allow advertisers to have unlimited access to children?

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As in many countries, including Canada, there is currently a push in the UK for a ban on “junk food” advertising to children. Naturally, there’s push-back but surprisingly not (just) from the food industry but from registered dietitians. I have to admit, I was pretty taken aback when I saw a number of Bristish dietitians arguing against this proposed ban on twitter last week. I know that we don’t always agree, but I thought that this would be one measure that all dietitians would support.

The arguments I saw against the ban were as follows:

  1. This won’t make much of a difference
  2. The term “junk food” is unscientific
  3. Only people who work in advertising should be allowed to have an opinion on advertising
  4. Parents should just “say no” to their children when they beg for products they’ve seen advertised
  5. Parents should do a better job parenting and control the tv their children are watching
  6. There are bigger issues than this so why are we wasting our time on support for an advertising ban
  7. This campaign is just about making Jamie Oliver look good

Let’s address these shall we?

  1. There is no one measure we can implement that will make a substantial change in childhood obesity and healthy eating. However, a ban such as this is just one of many measures that, together, will improve the eating habits of children. See last week’s post for a few other ideas. There is evidence to support restricting marketing of food (and other products) to children. If marketing to children wasn’t effective companies wouldn’t continue to do it.
  2. I agree that marketing to children should not apply to “junk food”. I think that a complete ban on advertising food should be implemented. This would avoid the whole distraction and difficulty of defining “healthy” and “unhealthy” foods and protect children from the promotion of food which encourages overeating and the development of unhealthy relationships with food.
  3. Do I even need to comment on this one? Does anyone outside of industry truly believe that industry self-regulation is a good idea? Yes, let’s put the fox in charge of the hen house. What could possibly go wrong?

4. Most parents I know would be much happier not to have to constantly have to say no to their children. Banning marketing of food to children would help parents to do their job. It would make it just that little bit easier.

5. Excuse me, your privilege is showing. Must be nice to be a parent who has complete control over every bit of advertising your child is exposed to and who prefers to “just say no” to your child when they’re pitching a fit in the grocery store.

6. Sure, there are lots of serious issues facing society and children today. That doesn’t mean that we can only address food insecurity at the expense of all other issues. Similar to number 1, we can address many issues simultaneously, and banning advertising to children really doesn’t have any downside (unless you’re feeling sorry for cereal and pop manufacturers).

7. Y’all know JO drives me as batty as the next person but I’m not inclined to cut off my nose to spite my face. I’m happy to put aside my disdain for Jamie in support of ending marketing to children.

For more information on Marketing to Kids, and to support Bill S-228 in Canada, check out Stop Marketing to Kids.

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Smart Swaps: Not so smart

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Public health is hard. I get it. I was there. It’s hard to come up with ways to improve population health. Nutrition is a particularly difficult area to address. After all, it’s not like smoking where you know that it’s unhealthy and your goal is to convince people to quit (or never start). Nutrition and our relationships with food are complicated. Unfortunately, in most cases, public health campaigns fall flat. I’m afraid that’s going to be the case with the latest Smart Swaps campaign in Britain.

As a few people point out in this news article, money could have been better spent revamping the food system to encourage healthy choices. I’d also like to suggest core curriculum for students so that food skills can be learned young and shared with the entire family.

Beyond the issues raised in the article (i.e. that resources could have been better used elsewhere) I have a bit of an issue with the smart swaps included in the campaign. They seem to be predominantly focussed on calories and weight loss. Yes, there’s swapping sugary cereal to unsweetened cereal, and swapping  sugar sweetened beverages to unsweetened beverages. Not bad swaps. But how about swapping whole milk to low-fat milk, and then swapping that for skimmed milk?  Or swapping butter to lower-fat butter or spreads and cheese to reduced-fat cheese? Yes, that will save you calories but that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re making healthier choices. Fat is not the enemy. Too much of anything is the enemy. Too much highly processed convenience food is the enemy. Not cooking (using minimally processed ingredients) is the enemy. These simple swaps are too simplistic to address the growing problem of obesity and malnutrition.