Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Follow Friday: Nima

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I’m skeptical about this (surprise, surprise, me, skeptical!) new device. If it works though, it sounds like it could be fairly revolutionary for people with celiac disease.

You take a little bit of your meal and put it in the Nima and it tells you if it’s safe to eat or not. Of course, there are some drawbacks. If the gluten contamination isn’t distributed throughout the meal it could provide you with a false sense of safety.

Eating out can be such a terrifying prospect for people with celiac disease. If something like this works, it could make the experience much less stressful and hazardous.


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Parasites for gluten!

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A friend alerted me to this article last week. Before we look at the actual research study, I need to say this is terrible reporting. The headline proclaims: Gluten allergies may be reduced using hookworms. No. Well, maybe. But probably not, and that’s certainly not what the study was looking at. No wonder people are confused about gluten. The study looked at the effect of hookworms on gluten tolerance in individuals with celiac disease. Which, we know, is not an allergy. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease in which consumption of gluten results in the destruction of microvilli in the small intestine in sufferers. Gluten allergy is a hypersensitivity of the immune system to the gluten (or one of its component proteins) protein. So… if you are allergic to gluten, don’t go infect yourself with hookworms and eat a sandwich. I wouldn’t recommend doing this if you have celiac disease either.

Looking at the actual study… It was very small (12 people, two of whom withdrew from the study before completion). When a study is so small, it’s impossible to say if the results would extend to the majority of those with celiac disease. Setting aside the fact that I’m doubtful that the majority of celiac disease sufferers would willingly ingest hookworms in order to be able to consume gluten again. That being said, it’s quite interesting that the study participants were able to gradually increase their gluten intake to 3 g of spaghetti a day without experiencing any overt, nor covert (i.e. intestinal damage) symptoms of celiac disease. Of course, that’s not a lot of gluten (about one cup of pasta a day) and the study took place over 12 weeks, with the largest quantity of pasta being consumed over the final two weeks. It would be interesting to see if intestinal damage was visible after an extended period of time or if greater quantities of gluten could be consumed.

Something else that I wondered about when reading the article was any potential complications from the use of hookworms. According to the Centre for Disease Control, most people with hookworms experience no symptoms. However, some many experience gastrointestinal distress and the most serious complication is blood loss leading to anemia, and protein loss.

Essentially, celiac disease leads to nutritional deficiencies when gluten is consumed. Introducing hookworms may allow celiac disease sufferers to consume gluten but may also lead to nutrient deficiencies. Alternatively, celiac disease sufferers can follow a nutritious gluten-free diet.


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Book review: Gluten Freedom

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After I wrote my post on Grain Brain I was contacted by the publisher of a new book about gluten Gluten Freedom. They offered to send me an advance reading copy with the hope that I would love it and share my love of it with others. Or, most likely, at the very least, not write a scathing review. Fortunately for them, I quite liked it.

Unlike other books about gluten *ahem* Wheat Belly, Grain Brain, this book isn’t about vilifying gluten or wheat. Dr Fasano even states that for anyone who doesn’t have celiac disease, a wheat or gluten allergy, or gluten sensitivity, there’s no reason to avoid gluten. This book is not about eliminating gluten to cure all ailments. It’s about how to deal with specific gluten disorders (primarily celiac disease).

I respect the fact that Dr Fasano is a researcher and not just a doctor aiming to prey on people who are desperate to lose weight. He actually conducts research experiments to examine celiac disease and the effects of gluten on other conditions. Gluten Freedom is not about fear mongering. It’s about how people with gluten-related disorders can live normal healthy lives.

This book isn’t for everyone. It’s more of a handbook to help people suffering from celiac disease (and their families) develop ways to live without gluten. There’s great information about addressing situations at school and for seniors. There’s also a couple of interesting chapters at the end discussing new preventions and treatments for celiac disease. In addition to being a handbook it’s also an informative read for health care practitioners and for an antidote for devotees of Davis and Perlmutter.


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Why gluten-free OJ isn’t completely ridiculous

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I keep hearing people mock foods that are labelled gluten-free such as orange juice and corn chips. Because these foods naturally do not contain gluten they think that labelling them as GF is laughable and simply capitalizing on the trendiness of GF diets. Sure, they may be taking advantage of the popularity of GF diets at the moment but I don’t think that’s a good reason to complain. For people who have celiac disease every label must be carefully scrutinized for glutinous ingredients. Even if a food doesn’t contain any gluten, it may still have come in contact with a gluten-containing food during processing. Yes, it may seem a little absurd to label  OJ gluten-free but it can help to put your mind at ease if you do need to follow a strict gluten-free diet.