Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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The skinny on teatox

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Photo by Iyad Tibi on flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Licence.

last week a friend tweeted this “Skinny Teatox” cleanse telling everyone to eat real food and cc’ed me. I figured it was worth a blog post because so many people think that tea is innocuous, and of course, when it’s being marketed as innocent “natural” herbs, who can blame them? The thing is, natural is not alway superior, nor is it always safe. There are plenty of deadly toxins of natural origin. This tea, while not in the deadly toxin category, is certainly not the healthiest choice, nor is it likely to help you lose weight.

Before I get started dissecting the ingredients though can I just make a brief comment on the price? $35 for SEVEN days! That’s $5 a day! That’s insanity! You can buy many lovely herbal, green, and black teas for a fraction of that price.

They claim that the tea is“Made with 100% natural ingredients that promote good health and weight loss.” The teas also contain no “chemicals” lol. They may however, contain: “Our products may contain all or some of the following: gluten, malva verticellata, cassia angustifolia (senna leaf), cascara sagrada, arctostaphylos uva ursi, ginseng, liquorice, chrysanthemum, orange peel, cinnamon bark, cloves, rhubarb and ginger. Skinny Teatox produces a laxative effect and can be toxic in high doses. Do not consume more than once every two days.” 

Gluten – safe for anyone who doesn’t have celiac disease or a gluten allergy (a protein found in grains)

malva verticillata – (I assume they just misspelled this one, gives you great confidence doesn’t it?) also known as “Chinese mallow” or “Cluter mallow” it’s commonly used as a laxative. Not much is known about side effects but it may affect blood sugar so those with diabetes should probably avoid it (1).

senna leaf – is a common over-the-counter laxative and should not be used regularly because it can be habit forming (i.e. you may come to rely on it to poop).

cascara sagrada – is bark from a shrub, again, used to treat constipation. It can’t be purchased as a drug because questions were raised regarding its safety but manufacturers didn’t want to comply with the FDA testing (not alarming whatsoever) (2). Most side effects are associated with long-term use.

arctostaphylos uva ursi – the leaves of a plant, generally used to treat urinary disorders, and (you guessed it!) constipation! (3). Short term side effects can include nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, and greenish urine. Long-term side effects can include liver damage, eye problems, breathing problems, convulsions, and death.

ginseng – may lower blood sugar, may act as a stimulant (4).

liquorice – a plant used to treat various digestive issues. May cause issues in people with certain health conditions and is not safe for long-term use (5).

chrysanthemum – used to treat, high blood pressure, chest pain, type 2 diabetes… It’s also a popular summertime tea in China. May cause an allergic reaction in some people as it’s in the same family as ragweed (6).

orange peel – I think we’re getting down into the flavourings now so I’m not going to continue. You get the idea. The vast majority of the ingredients in these natural herbal teas are laxatives. They’re not going to “detox” you or make you “skinny”. And if you need help pooping might I suggest that you save your money and go for some cheaper, safer, healthier natural remedies such as: increasing your fibre and water intake, prunes, coffee, exercise. If you suffer from chronic constipation please speak with your primary health care provider. Disclaimer: This is just a blog, I don’t know your personal medical information and can’t possibly provide you with medical advice in this forum.


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Dr Oz: regular dose of bull

A part of me says that I should stop blogging about terrible advice given by Dr Oz. I know that I’m largely preaching to the choir. However, as long as he keeps spewing incorrect, and potentially dangerous advice, I can’t help but hope that some of his devotees will stumble across my rantings and question his assertions. So… What has he done now? Check out this tweet:

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In the past, aloe vera latex was used to treat constipation. However, due to concerns about dependency, it was removed from the market in 2002 (1). Aloe vera juice may also be effective as a laxative (2); however, there are additional concerns (3) to take into consideration before making blanket recommendations. As many pregnant women suffer from constipation, I think that it’s important to mention that consumption of aloe vera (juice or gel or latex) is not recommended during pregnancy as there is a risk of uterine contractions.

Considering that there are numerous concerns surrounding the supplemental use of aloe vera, and many known safe and effective ways to improve regularity, the recommendation that people drink aloe juice daily to relieve constipation is baffling. Stick to the tried and true: increase fibre (through whole grains, seeds (such as ground flax and chia, legumes, fruits, and vegetables, and possibly a supplement) and water intake, try prune juice, exercise, coffee (if you are able to consume caffeine). Some medications and medical conditions may cause constipation. If this is something that you’re experiencing on a regular basis, you should check with your doctor to see if a medication can be changed or if there is an underlying condition causing your constipation.