Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Is feminism making us fat?

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I know that paying any heed to articles on The Rebel is the same as reading Breitbart or repeatedly lighting myself on fire but I just can’t resist responding to this article purporting that feminism has “fuelled the obesity crisis” because come fucking on. And who knows, maybe there is a small segment of the population who reads my blog and that site and maybe, just maybe, I can get them (you?) to reconsider their opposition to feminism.

Perhaps we should begin with a refresher about what feminism is. Feminism is the “the advocacy of women’s rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes.” Feminism is the belief that men and women should receive equal pay for work of equal value. Feminism is not the belief that men are inferior to women. Feminists are not a bunch of man-hating female nationalists. We are men and women who do not believe that people should be denied opportunities on the basis of gender. Feminism is not about putting men down but about lifting women up so that we can all attain our goals.

Okay, now that we’ve got that out of the way, let’s talk about the connection between feminism and obesity. Supposedly, because women are working at paid jobs more than we did in the glory days of the patriarchy we’re not slaving away in the kitchen to put nourishing meals on the table for our families. Hence, we are reliant on fast food and ready-meals that are making our families fat.

There’s little doubt that we are (as a nation) far too reliant on take-out and highly processed foods. I don’t believe that this is the consequence of feminism though. Nor do I believe that taking away women’s jobs and relegating them to the kitchen is the solution. This suggestion that women are to blame for obesity only serves to make working mums feel guilty and sexists to feel vindicated. Sorry but I’m not buying it. Correlation does not equal causation. Women working more outside the home may correlate with rising obesity rates but so do lots of other things like hydro bill rates, college tuition rates, drug poisoning rates, etc. Just because two things are correlated doesn’t mean that there’s any relationship between the two. Reliance on processed food is likely a factor in developing obesity but it’s not the only factor. Obesity is a complex multi-factoral issue with no single cause.

I might add that men are perfectly capable of cooking as well. You want me to believe that men are superior and yet they can’t manage to boil a pot of water or cut up some vegetables? Come on now. I know I’m only a woman but even I can see the flaw in this logic. Everyone can, and should, get cooking and women should continue to do whatever jobs they damn well please.

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Should feminists stay out of the kitchen?

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I read this article the other day and it made me go back and take a look at the post I wrote a little while back about how we need to stop glorifying the inability to cook.

The article is about how “real women” are still expected to cook and examines the role of women in sitcoms and cooking shows. It made me wonder if my original take was sexist. Did I only talk about women? I was certainly thinking about female characters like Lorelai Gilmore and Olivia Pope. I did also think about the importance of showing men cooking but maybe I didn’t make that very clear. I definitely didn’t think about the possibility that showing women who were incapable of cooking (or at least unwilling to cook) was actually a feminist act. And I really have mixed feelings about it right now.

I do not believe that a woman belongs in the kitchen. I do not think that it’s a woman’s measure of worth to serve the men and children in their lives. I don’t think that we all need to love cooking or spend as much time doing it as I do. However, I wonder if making a refusal to cook is truly a feminist act or more an instance of cutting off one’s nose to spite one’s face. It may be levelling the playing field to have both men and women out of the kitchen but I think that’s more bringing everyone down a level rather than lifting everyone up.

As I said in my previous post, cooking is an important life skill. Food literacy is as important as any other form of literacy. What we prepare for ourselves is generally going to be more nutritious and less calorically dense than food we purchase ready-made and from restaurants. It’s better for us and better for our wallets. It doesn’t have to mean hours of slaving over a hot stove. A good home cooked meal can be as quick and simple as a vegetable frittata or stir-fry; ready in under 30 minutes.

We should be encouraging more people to get in the kitchen, not glorifying culinary ineptitude. On television we should be showing both men and women cooking for themselves, for their families, for their friends, and show children helping in the kitchen. In real life, we should be advocating to have mandatory home ec reinstated in schools. We (both women and men) should be taking the effort to prepare nourishing meals for ourselves because we are all worthy of good nutrition.


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Follow Friday: @tspbasil

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This week’s RD to follow is Deanna Segrave-Daly, nominated by last week’s Mary Brighton. Deanna’s a dietitian in Philadelphia who loves bread, cheese, and Prosecco. In addition to cofounding Blog Brulee (an annual dietitian blogger conference) and Recipe Redux (a challenge whereby participating RDs give recipes makeovers to improve their nutritional profile while keeping them flavourful) she also blogs at Teaspoon of Spice with fellow dietitian Serena Ball.

When I asked Deanna what she’d like me to share with you, she asked that I tell you about their Healthy Kitchen Hack series. In this series, they feature tips to help you “save time, be more confident with your cooking and make your meals more nutritious and delicious”. They share these tips regularly on their blog and you can also sign-up for extra kitchen hacks via email. A few topics they’ve covered in the past include the easiest way to remove seeds from a pomegranate, how to make homemade protein powder, and how to stop parchment paper from curling-up.

You can follow Deanna on twitter at @tspbasil for lots of great recipes and cooking tips.

If you know a dietitian who I should feature on the blog, please send me a nomination!


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Follow Friday: @Taste_Workshop

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Michele Redmond is a chef and dietitian in Arizona who’s passion is helping people live well through enjoyment of food. She refers to herself as a “food enjoyment eating activist”  (love it!) and says that she has no patience for promoting restrictive eating as a solution to obesity – AMEN to that! She wants to help people create their own healthy eating environments where “food is a solution, not a problem”.

When I asked Michele if there was anything in particular she’d like me to share about her, she said that she’s planning to launch her own blog next month where she’ll be ranting about “our crazy food/eating culture” so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, you can find Michele on twitter at @Taste_Workshop or on her website The Taste Workshop. Her website has information about current and past events on great topics like knife skills and cooking with fermented dairy.

When Monika (last week’s Follow Friday) suggested Michele for a Follow Friday post she told me that Michele has helped her with recipe development and that she’s “big on helping people feel confident about appreciating how our sense of taste works”. Thanks for introducing us Monika!

If you know a dietitian who I should feature in a Follow Friday post, please send me your nomination(s)!

 


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Let’s stop glorifying the inability to cook

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Despite the proliferation of cooking shows in recent years it seems that most television programs glorify the anti-cooking life. Sure, there are shows like Masterchef and Chopped and all of the standard celeb cooking shows but those are far removed from the reality of the average home cook. They glorify challenges and gourmet meals, not getting supper on the table for a family after a long day of work.

When I think about pretty much any tv series or movie these days nobody cooks. It’s like a badge of honour to have an untarnished kitchen. A sort a bragging about being unable to cook. Can’t you just picture Olivia Pope curled up on her couch after a long day of falling in and out of love with the president with a big bowl of popcorn and a big glass of wine? Or how about all the shows that have an iconic restaurant, diner, or coffee shop where all of the characters meet on the daily? When I try to think of shows that feature regular family meals they’re all from my childhood and generally assume that it’s the woman’s job to feed the household. I don’t think that equality has to come at the expense of home cooked meals. My boyfriend and I take turns cooking depending on our schedules. Eating out is a treat, not a daily, or even weekly occurrence.

Being able to cook is something that should be considered an essential life skill. I can’t imagine anyone bragging about being illiterate. When people proudly proclaim their incompetence in the kitchen to me that’s the same thing. It’s bragging about being food illiterate. I’m not saying we all need to be gourmet chefs or cook every single meal at home from scratch but we do need a cultural shift. These shows reflect our reality and our reality mirrors these shows. Let’s stop aspiring to a life where the closest we come to cooking is reheating leftover delivery and start showing individuals and households where cooking is the norm.