Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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What is a milk allergy?

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I can’t believe I haven’t written a post since August! I was naive to believe that I would have time to keep up with things like blogging with a newborn. Even as I type this I’m nursing her and it will probably take me a couple of days to finish writing this post. I’m not complaining, it’s just that my priorities have changed and feeding this little nugget takes up most of my time. However, feeding her has also prompted me to write this post. She has a suspected cow’s milk allergy (suspected because they won’t do allergy testing on infants) and by the comments I’ve gotten from people it seems that there’s a lot of misunderstanding about this allergy.

Food allergies in general are reactions to proteins found in foods. In the case of a cow’s milk allergy, that reaction is to either the whey and/or casein protein found in milk. Babies with a cow’s milk allergy will react to the protein passed to them through breastmilk as well as to the protein in most infant formulas. This means that breastfeeding moms must remove dairy from their diets. For some moms this may just mean obvious sources of dairy such as milk, cheese, and yoghurt (note: eggs are not dairy – I actually read an article by a doctor listing eggs as dairy *face-palm*). More sensitive babies may require complete removal of all dairy-containing foods from their diets, even foods in which a milk product is a very minor ingredient. Babies who are formula-fed will require special hypoallergenic formula in which the proteins are broken-down so that they can digest them.

A cow’s milk allergy is not the same as lactose intolerance which is a reaction to the lactose which is a milk sugar, not a protein. Lactose intolerance is actually extremely uncommon in infants as lactose is present in breastmilk. Generally, lactose intolerance is something that develops as children age. This means that lactose-free dairy products are unsafe for people with cow’s milk allergy and mom’s who are breastfeeding babies with this allergy.

Some people with cow’s milk allergy may tolerate goat’s milk. Goat’s milk contains casein but a slightly different version than that found in cow’s milk. However, the similar structure means that some people who are allergic to cow’s milk will also react to goat’s milk.

In things that I never thought would be an issue: I can’t tell you how many times I’ve asked if a baked good is dairy-free and received the response that they contain gluten. Huh? I’m not sure if this is indicative of people genuinely not knowing what dairy and/or gluten is or if it’s a result of avoidance of both these things being trendy. For those who genuinely may not be aware: dairy is products made from cow’s milk such as ice cream, cheese, yoghurt, milk, and butter. Gluten is a protein found in some grains, wheat being the most commonly consumed.

Do you have a food allergy? I’d love to hear your stories of ignorant comments below.


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Look at this almond milk drinking hipster

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I feel like the anti-almond milk article Lay Off the Almond Milk, You Ignorant Hipsters that was published in Mother Jones and making the rounds on social media last week was intentionally crafted to get a rise out of people. If the author, Tom Philpott, really wanted to educate people about the downside to almond milk I don’t think he would have led with a title like that (or maybe he had nothing to do with the title and Mother Jones is just trying to rustle some hipster jimmies). Regardless, I’m sure some jimmies were rustled. I’ll take the bait.

I’m far from a hipster myself, but I still feel like I have to defend the consumption of almond milk, to a degree. I think that Philpott raises some very valid and important points. Almond milk is not as nutritious as cow’s milk, or even soy milk. It’s very low in protein. Our sudden love for almonds is also an environmental concern. I’ve heard that bees are trucked from all over the States for the almond pollination in Cali every year. Consuming almonds as milk is also certainly not the most nutritious way in which to consume them. But…

Philpott neglects to address those who cannot consume cow’s milk. He touches on lactose intolerance. However, not everyone who consumes almond milk is a lactose-intolerant hipster. There are a number of reasons that people do not consume cow’s milk: milk allergy, veganism, poverty (milk is expensive!), religion, personal preference. These people deserve an alternative to cow’s milk. Almond, soy, rice, hemp, coconut, flax, and quinoa milks all provide reasonable alternatives for cooking, cereal, and drinking. It’s not like cow’s don’t have a huge environmental footprint themselves. I think the key here, as with everything, is to consume a variety of foods.


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Milk myths and vegan propaganda

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You know that I’m no great lover of milk. I have written a number of times about chocolate milk (for my newer readers here are just a few of those posts: The chocolate milk and exercise myth, Is chocolate milk essential to good nutrition?, Don’t cry over chocolate milk). Chocolate milk is delicious because it is essentially a liquid candy bar. White milk is definitely a better choice from a nutrition stand-point. Personally, I loathe a glass of milk (my mum can vouch for my life-long efforts to avoid milk consumption) but I’m more than happy to put it on my cereal, add it to a smoothie, or use it in a recipe. Despite my distaste for milk as a beverage, and a food group, I still think that it has nutritional merits and that people who enjoy it should not be discouraged from drinking it. Putting my personal opinions about milk aside, I was frustrated to read the article 5 Ridiculous Myths About  Cows Milk this week.

Myth 1: You need cow’s milk to get calcium

It’s true, you don’t need milk to get calcium. There are plenty of other food sources of calcium. However, the statements that, “the calcium contained in cow’s milk is barely absorbable to the human body” and, “The most calcium-rich foods on the planet comes from plants, especially leafy greens such as kale, spinach, and broccoli” are not entirely true.

It seems that calcium absorption from milk products and kale is similar (1) – about 30-35%. Spinach is notorious for being loaded with calcium that is not bioavailable to us – about 5% (2).

Myth 2: Cow’s milk will give you strong bones

Contrary to the claim that cow’s milk will actually result in weakened bones, there is no reason to believe that it will hinder bone strength. Although, there’s also no reason to believe that milk consumption will strengthen bones either. The best way to ensure strong bones is to engage in regular exercise, especially strength training.

Myth 3: Cow’s milk isn’t cruel

Here’s where the article really goes off the rails. The discussion of veal is irrelevant to the discussion of milk. Dairy cows and cows raised for meat are not one and the same. Yes, we have all seen the recent mistreatment of dairy cows. I’m willing to bet that this was the exception and not the norm. Just like humans, cows need to be relaxed to produce milk. Most dairy farmers treat their cows with love and respect.

Myth 4: Cows need to be milked

I can’t argue with this one. Obviously this is a matter of supply and demand. If cows are regularly milked, they will continue to produce milk, even without calves to feed. If cows are not regularly milked, and do not have offspring to feed, they will cease milk production. I’m not sure how this factors in as an argument against milk consumption by humans.

Myth 5: Cow’s milk is for humans

The argument is that cow’s milk is intended to feed baby cows and that no other species consumes the milk of another. Honestly, there was a time when I was like, “yeah, this makes sense. It’s so unnatural for us to drink milk from another species.” Then I thought about it a little more. We do A LOT of things that no other species do. Just from a food standpoint alone: we cook our food in a variety of ways, we preserve food in a number of ways, we eat at restaurants, we combine ingredients to make a recipe… Just because no other species does these things doesn’t mean that we should cease doing them as well.


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Follow Friday: You’re drinking the wrong kind of milk

Just Mooching Around (geddit?)

A friend shared this article on twitter last week. While I can’t vouch for the science behind it (any readers able to?), I did find it very interesting. I know a number of people who have mentioned that they have “lactose intolerance” here, in North America, but when they travel overseas to places like France they have no trouble digesting any dairy products. I wonder if this could also help to explain the people who’ve told me that the local East Coast Organic milk is the only kind they can tolerate. Perhaps it has less to do with what the cows are eating, and more to do with the breed of cow. Something to chew on.