Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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11 easy steps to get a youthful body like J.Lo

So, you want to tap into the fountain of youth like Jennifer Lopez? According to this article all you need to do is to follow her nutrition regimen. Simple enough, right? They’re the typical celeb nutrition tips: drink more water, cut-out sugar, don’t drink caffeine or alcohol, eat “clean”, yada, yada. Then be super disappointed when you don’t look like J.Lo and you’re miserable because all the joy has been removed from eating. Fear not, because I can tell you the real step-by-step foolproof way to obtain Jennifer Lopez’s body:

  1. Get rich.
  2. Hire a personal trainer and find time to workout for several hours a day.
  3. Hire a personal chef and/or “nutritionist” who will prepare all of your “clean” meals for you.
  4. Have the right genetics. This one is important, steps one through three will only work if you have “optimal” genetic material to start. Without this, no amount of kale or pilates will help you to become three inches shorter or to grow an inch.
  5. Hire a make-up artist so that your skin always looks perfect.
  6. Hire a stylist so that your clothing is always a perfect fit and super stylish.
  7. Hire a hair stylist so that you’re never seen with limp or frizzy hair in public.
  8. Hire a PR firm so that no imperfect images of you ever make it to the public.
  9. Hire a personal assistant so that you don’t have to worry about any of the trivial day-to-day concerns that the plebeians concern themselves with.
  10. If you have children, have a nanny or two so that you don’t have to tire yourself out caring for them.
  11. Consider plastic surgery. J.Lo may not need it but without it your breasts, waist, hips, etc. may never look like hers.

Follow these easy eleven steps and you too, can look just like Jennifer Lopez.


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Book Review: @thefuckitdiet

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This review is not going to be as thorough as I like to be. I listened to this book on Audible while I was doing other things like cooking, cleaning, and walking the dog so I didn’t take notes and I wasn’t always paying the closest attention. That being said, for the most part, I thought it was great.

The overall message of the book is that we need to stop being so hard on ourselves for doing something as natural as eating food. That in order to reestablish a healthy relationship with food we need to stop dieting altogether and give ourselves permission to consume food in ways that we have told ourselves is “wrong”. For example, allowing ourselves to eat foods we’ve told ourselves are “bad” and allowing ourselves to overeat. This book is basically about undoing the conditioning we’ve done to ourselves over the years by making eating emotionally fraught.

The only real issue I took with any of the book was with some of the science, which I found to be questionable. I should have taken notes because I can’t remember exactly what Dooner was saying and having listened to the audiobook it’s not like I can easily flip to the references to look things up. I do remember her talking about the causes of candida overgrowth and mention of heavy metals being the cause (not sugar consumption). As far as I’m aware, there is still a lack of quality research in this area, and we really don’t know what causes some women to be prone to yeast infections. Dooner also mentions Chris Kresser as a source at one point (no, not a source of candida, but as an expert on something – again, I should have taken notes). I’m not a fan of Kresser. He’s got something to sell and claims to have the cure for everything that ails us. His website is a trove of red flags when it comes to nutrition information and he’s an acupuncturist and anti-vaxxer who cured his own chronic illness. Not someone I would want to be associated with. Anyway… as long as you don’t get hung-up on the science, I think that a lot of people could benefit from this book.

Dooner offers practical actions for the reader to undertake that should help move them closer to a healthy relationship with food. I think her attitude and approach are refreshing. I mean, her entire “diet” is literally: fuck it. Stop stressing so much about food. Stop trying to force your body to conform to some fucked-up wealthy white patriarchal ideal. Forget everything you’ve learned or told yourself over the years about diet, food, and what you should and shouldn’t be doing. Stop wasting time and energy obsessing about your weight and start living life to the fullest.

If you’re interested, Dooner is running an online book club starting on May 26th (you only have a few more days to enrol – enrolment ends on May 24th – so get off that fence if you’re thinking about it). This will include weekly Q&A sessions, discussion, and more. Check-out thefuckitdiet.com/club to learn more and sign-up. You can also follow Dooner on twitter and instgram @thefuckitdiet where she shares snippets from the book, quotes, and stories of her adorable dog.


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What to eat when you’re pregnant

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By now you may be aware that I’m pregnant. This is great news both personally and for more blog material – apologies if prenatal nutrition is of no interest to you. Now that the word is out, I feel comfortable sharing some of my observations.

First off, take the nutrition advice from apps with a grain of salt. These were likely not developed by registered dietitians and may not contain the greatest information. Aside from those, you might be getting your nutrition recommendations from prenatal classes which you would think would be better but I wasn’t super impressed with some of the information provided in the online class that I did (here’s hoping the in-person class is better!).

The general advice is fine: this is an important time to be getting adequate nutrition as, though technically not, the fetus is pretty damn close to a parasite. It’s going to deplete you of all of your iron and calcium stores if you don’t makes sure you’re consuming enough to replenish them. However, I took exception to some of the outdated advice I saw in the class I completed.

There’s a section on gestational diabetes which is followed-up by the section on prenatal nutrition. In this section there’s a sample meal plan which is whack for anyone, let alone a pregnant woman who is concerned about developing gestational diabetes. Highlights include breakfast: toast, oatmeal with banana, jam, and a glass of milk; snack: vanilla yoghurt and dried apricots; bedtime snack: frozen yoghurt. Hello blood sugar spikes! And I mean honestly, who eats toast and oatmeal for breakfast? Get some damn protein in there (nut butter, nuts, seeds, eggs…). And that snack, smh. Plain or no sugar-added yoghurt with berries would be a better choice or there are loads of other nutritious snack options that don’t contain sugar. I thought we’d moved past recommending frozen yoghurt like a decade ago. It’s generally higher in sugar than ice cream and not nearly as nutritious as regular un-frozen yoghurt. Which leads me to the swap suggestions.

There was a page of “if you’re craving this, try that”. Not that there was anything wrong with the suggestions (things like pretzels instead of potato chips and a grilled chicken burger instead of a regular beef burger) but I’m of the mind that you should listen to your body and give it what it wants. There is nothing wrong with having some chips or a burger when you’re pregnant, or when you’re not. And then there was that freaking frozen yoghurt again! I saw ice cream and groaned and said to my boyfriend, “how much do you want to bet they’re going to say to have froyo instead?” Wisely, not a bet he was willing to take as, of course, it was frozen yoghurt.

At one point they advised to “avoid foods with chemicals” which is meaningless and completely unhelpful advice. All food is comprised of chemicals.

I also wish that they had acknowledged the food aversions, cravings, and nausea/vomiting that many pregnant women experience. For women who are experiencing severe “morning” sickness it can be better to eat what they can stomach when they can stomach it. You can tell women to eat lots of vegetables, fish, and whole grains but if these foods aren’t going to sit well with them then that advice is not helpful. Women who require advice beyond that provided in the online class should ask their doctor for a referral to see a Registered Dietitian. Those living in Ontario can also call Telehealth Ontario at 1-866-797-0000 Monday-Friday 9-5 to speak with a RD for free.

There should also be recognition that listening to our bodies and our hunger and fullness cues is important. If you want ice cream, eat some ice cream. And if you want frozen yoghurt (to each their own), eat some froyo. Just like you’ll learn when it comes time for infant feeding, you should trust yourself and trust your tummy.


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Another hot take on Canada’s new food guide

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You all know that I can always find something to bitch about. I’m that girl who’s always the one to find a bug in her freshly picked raspberries or the bone in her piece of fish. My mum will attest to that. It was a running joke in my family that if there was anything weird to be found in the food, I would be the one to find it. So, it should come as no surprise that I have lots to say about the new food guide. But… it may come as a surprise that I don’t actually have anything negative to say about it! In fact, I think it’s pretty fucking great.

In no particular order, here are the changes that I’m most excited about:

  • The addition of food skills (and food literacy). This is literally 85% of my job and it feels really good to have Health Canada supporting it as an important part of healthy eating.
  • The removal of juice as a serving of fruit. It’s going to be so nice not to have to deal with that terrible piece of advice anymore.
  • The removal of serving sizes and recommended number of servings. They confused people and it’s impossible to make recommendations that will work for the entire population. I can’t wait to no longer hear “I can’t eat ALL that” again.
  • I’m glad they got rid of the meat and alternatives and milk and alternatives food groups and lumped them into a proteins group from which they encourage plant-based sources of protein.
  • I appreciate the inclusion of Indigenous foods and ways of eating and the acknowledgement that many people in remote communities and on reserves may struggle to meet the recommendations in the food guide.
  • Following from that, I also appreciate the recognition that external factors, in particular, many social determinants of health, can affect the ability of people to follow a healthy diet.
  • I’m glad that water is recommended as the beverage of choice, again bye bye juice and chocolate milk 👋🏻👋🏻👋🏻
  • I like that the emphasis is on promoting health and only once is weight mentioned. As I’ve ranted about in the past, the food guide is not supposed to be a weight loss diet plan.
  • The photos included in the guide are really appealing. They look way more appetizing to me than the old cartoonish images did. Plus, they’re all about full meals and not just random foods.
  • The overall focus is on a healthy pattern of eating, not just individual nutrients. Much more in-line with how we actually eat. Plus it’s advised that we enjoy (wow!) our food.

My one concern (aside from a couple of very minor things) is that apparently Health Canada does not plan on making the resources for the general public available in print. I think this is a huge mistake. Not everyone has ready Internet access. Also, the old food guide was used in schools and other educational settings (including the food literacy classes I teach) as a teaching tool. I work in public health and we get MANY requests from schools, organizations, and individuals for copies of the food guide. I’m not sure how we’re going to educate people and incorporate the food guide into our programs if we don’t have a print resource available. I hope that Health Canada will reconsider this decision so that everyone has equal opportunity to benefit from the new food guide.


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What obesity and homosexuality have in common

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A couple of weeks ago I was listening to an episode of Radiolab on which they shared an episode of the short podcast series Unerased titled: Dr Davison and the Gay Cure. They were talking about the former perception of homosexuality as a disorder and the rise of conversion therapy. As I was listening what they were saying really struck a chord with me. I found myself thinking “this is exactly how people are going to think about weight loss counselling one day”.

On the podcast, they were saying, essentially, it doesn’t matter if people come to us wanting to change. What does it actually mean to help them? “The problem that these people are asking us to solve is a problem we created. That we labeled as a problem.” Even if we could effect certain changes, there is the more important question as to whether we should… It makes no difference how successful the treatment is, it is immoral.” And I was like “YES, this exact same thing could be said about weight loss treatment!”

This belief in relation to homosexuality was considered to be fringe and most people weren’t in support of it initially. This parallels the Health at Every Size/body diversity/weight acceptance movement. There is a lot of push-back from people in the medical community and the general public when it’s suggested that weight is not a condition that needs to be treated. Just as with the acceptance of homosexuality as a normal state, there were a few outspoken pioneers leading the movement and with time, it became more accepted by the mainstream. I feel that this is beginning to happen now with weight. More of us RDs who were always taught that “overweight” and “obesity” are unhealthy are coming to realize that people can be healthy at many different sizes.

Of course, there are still hold-outs and there is still conversion therapy happening in some places. Similarly, there will likely continue to be hold-outs who believe that only thin people can be healthy and that BMI is indicative of health. However, I’m hopeful that we’re reaching a turning point and that one day the medical community will agree that weight is not a “problem” and that weight loss treatments are unethical.