Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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How a dietitian does a juice cleanse

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Image by 从峰 陈 on flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Licence

I really like the idea of Bon Appetit’s Healthyish column because, as I’ve mentioned before, a healthy diet isn’t about bland deprivation. However, a recent column made my blood boil.

I knew that nothing good would come from reading a column titled: How a Food Critic Does a Juice Cleanse but like a moth to a flame I just couldn’t help myself from clicking on the link when it appeared in my inbox. It was even worse than I imagined.

I can understand the difficulty that a food critic would have maintaining a balanced diet. Travelling can do a number on even the most conscientious eaters with the large portions at restaurants and the often insufficient quantities of vegetables, particularly in the States. It must be even more difficult for a food critic who has to sample many dishes and courses. That being said, the article should have ended mid-way through the first sentence: “Step 1: Don’t do it unless you have to” should have read: Don’t do it. Probably not enough words for SEO, but a much better message.

Initially I was pleasantly surprised to see the author, food critic Andrew Knowlton write: “Yes, I’m aware that pretty much every dietician says that juicing is not good for you.” Okay, good, he misspelled dietitian but at least he’s acknowledging that the profession devoted to nutrition and helping people make good food choices is opposed to juice cleanses. Sadly, it was all downhill from there.

It’s not that Knowlton chose to torture himself by consuming only juice for five days. Yes, I think that’s foolish, unhealthy, and unnecessary, but he’s an adult and can make his own decisions. It’s that he did this in front of his daughters. This honestly enraged me. Children learn from what they see others doing and their parents are usually their most powerful role models. Yes, Knowlton continued to cook bacon and actual food for his daughters but they saw him subsisting off juice. What message is that giving them? It’s teaching them that this is normal adult behaviour. That we can’t be healthy by consuming whole foods. That when we believe we’ve overindulged the solution is to starve ourselves. That diets, disordered eating, and self-inflicted punishment are synonymous with health and virtue. That is not a healthy message to be teaching children. Regardless of what Knowlton is telling his girls, actions speak louder than words. He may well be telling them to eat balanced meals and whole foods but if he’s doing that while sipping on a beet-ginger juice the juice is going to speak louder than the words.

If I may be so bold, I’d like to propose a rebuttal column: How a Dietitian Does a Juice Cleanse. Step 1: Don’t do it.

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Follow Friday: @Evergreen_RD

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Back on track with the RD Follow Fridays for the penultimate Friday in Nutrition Month. This week I’d like to suggest you follow the fabulous Marianne Bloudoff of BC. Like me, she took a meandering path to a career in dietetics. Unlike me, she had a cool career in fisheries management before heading back to uni to study dietetics in order to combine her love for both science and nutrition.

Much like me, again, she ended up moving away from the ocean to work in public health. She’s currently employed as a population health dietitian with the Northern Health Authority and is the regional lead for food security. The region being the entire northern half of the province. She’s a regular contributor to the Northern Health Matters blog.

I got to find out some other cool facts about Marianne when I told her I wanted to write a post on her. Like, did you know that she competed for Australia in synchronized skating at the world championships?? How cool is that?! On a less cool note, she’s one of those unfortunate souls who dislikes cilantro :(

You can find Marianne blogging at Evergreen Eats or follow her on various social medias… She’s on twitter as @Evergreen_RD where you can find her posting about nutrition, recipes, politics, and whatever else strikes her fancy. On Instagram as @Evergreen_RD where she primarily posts gorgeous food photos. On Facebook as (nope, she fooled you!) EvergreeneatsRD where she shares lots of food porn and recipes and I’m getting hungry writing this post. Last but not least, for the dog lovers out there, you can follow her French Bulldog Barley on Instagram too @barley_thefrenchie.

Do you know an amazing RD who should be featured in a future Follow Friday post? Get at me!


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Follow Friday: @fatnutritionist

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This week I’m telling you all that you should follow Michelle Allison (aka @fatnutritionist). That is, if you don’t already.

Michelle is a dietitian in Toronto who is a strong advocate for loving your body, no matter its size, and for being friends with food. She has the best twitter rants. I also really admire that she’s been using her platform on twitter to advocate for resistance in the US.

You can also find Michelle at thefatnutritionist.com.

Do you know a dietitian who I should feature in a future Follow Friday post? Let me know in the comments, via twitter, or email.


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Follow Friday: @EmKyleNutrition

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Nominated by last week’s Follow Friday, Deanna Segrave-Daly, this week’s RD to follow is Emily Kyle. Emily is a Holistic Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. Don’t let the “holistic” fool you, she’s an RDN with a Master’s in science. Emily’s all about helping her clients get “healthy and happy without ever having to diet again”. A sentiment I wholeheartedly agree with.

You can follow Emily on Twitter at @EmKyleNutrition where she shares loads of drool-worthy nutritious recipes. You can also find her at Emily Kyle Nutrition where she blogs about popular nutrition topics, shares recipes, and can be reached if you wish to work with her. You can also find her on Facebook at (you guessed it) EmilyKyleNutrition.

Do you know an RD you think should be featured in a Follow Friday post? Let me know in the comments below or via twitter or email.

 


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Follow Friday: @tspbasil

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This week’s RD to follow is Deanna Segrave-Daly, nominated by last week’s Mary Brighton. Deanna’s a dietitian in Philadelphia who loves bread, cheese, and Prosecco. In addition to cofounding Blog Brulee (an annual dietitian blogger conference) and Recipe Redux (a challenge whereby participating RDs give recipes makeovers to improve their nutritional profile while keeping them flavourful) she also blogs at Teaspoon of Spice with fellow dietitian Serena Ball.

When I asked Deanna what she’d like me to share with you, she asked that I tell you about their Healthy Kitchen Hack series. In this series, they feature tips to help you “save time, be more confident with your cooking and make your meals more nutritious and delicious”. They share these tips regularly on their blog and you can also sign-up for extra kitchen hacks via email. A few topics they’ve covered in the past include the easiest way to remove seeds from a pomegranate, how to make homemade protein powder, and how to stop parchment paper from curling-up.

You can follow Deanna on twitter at @tspbasil for lots of great recipes and cooking tips.

If you know a dietitian who I should feature on the blog, please send me a nomination!