Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Ditch the meds: a dietitian dispensing drugs

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Image by mkhmarketing on flickr. Used under a Creative Commons Licence.

One of my biggest pet peeves as a dietitian is the fact that so many non-dietitians fancy themselves to be nutrition experts. It’s one thing when it’s a “holistic nutritionist” at least they have some degree of nutrition education. It’s another entirely when it’s another regulated healthcare professional who seemingly has no concept of scope of practice. For those, such as the pharmacist I came across on twitter who states in her twitter bio “Pharmacist who would rather dispense nutrition than Rx.”, who may not know what scope of practice is: scope of practice describes the procedures, actions, and processes that a healthcare practitioner is permitted to undertake in keeping with the terms of their professional license. For a pharmacist, that means providing evidence-based advice and guidance on medications. For a dietitians, that means providing evidence-based advice and guidance on nutrition.

The pharmacist in question decided not to become a dietitian because she didn’t want spend the money to study the “low-fat” guidelines that apparently comprise the entirety of a degree in dietetics. How easy it is to be critical of a program when you clearly have no idea what the area of study consists of.

You know, I’d really like to be a pharmacist but I don’t agree with the excessive prescription of antibiotics. I think that instead of going to uni and studying pharmacology I’ll just start telling people what medications they should take for their ailments based on my own research and dispensing them online. Oh but that would be dangerous and I’d probably lose my licence to practice dietetics and face prison time. Yet, somehow it’s totally okay for someone who’s never studied nutrition to use their credentials as a regulated health professional (in a completely different field) to advise and influence people through social media, a blog, and conventional media. Ironically, as a registered dietitian I can’t even provide specific nutrition advice through those channels because sensibly one knows that I don’t have enough knowledge about the recipient of that advice to provide appropriate information.

Why even go to university for years, complete internships, pay to write a national exam, pay the college of dietitians $600 a year, and continue to learn about nutrition when it’s so easy? I could be cherry picking sensational “science” and promoting a “sexy” diet without having taken a single course in nutrition/dietetics. Sigh.

My point is, be savvy about where you get your information. Just because someone has credentials in one field does not make them a credible source of information in another field.