Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Something doesn’t add-up with “Doing the Math” or: Food insecurity from a place of privilege

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Photo Credit: Food Banks Canada

I used to be a fan of things like Do the Math. These challenges where public figures (especially those in government) had to live on budgets akin to those on social assistance, or on food bank donations, seemed like a great eye opener. It was good for the mayor to understand that people are hungry. For those living in poverty, adequate calories are often unattainable, let alone healthy meals. While I’m not entirely opposed to such challenges, I’m no longer enthusiastically on board.

 

These challenges have been happening for years. And what benefit have they had? The politicians and do-gooders have experienced first-hand, for a week, that living in poverty sucks. They say, “wow, social assistance, disability, part-time minimum wage… is not enough money to put adequate nutritious food in our bellies.” And then??? Nothing. Nothing has changed as a result of these challenges. People are still going to the food banks and still going hungry. If these challenges resulted in actual change to our social supports then I’d be all for them. But they don’t, they’re not, and they won’t. And frankly, it’s kind of starting to piss me off that people can be so privileged that they can choose to follow a low/no budget diet for a week. In addition, I’ve always wondered if the food hampers they’re given take food away from those truly in need.

 

Let’s not even take into consideration the living standards that those in poverty often endure, couch surfing, unsafe and unpleasant apartments, sleeping in cars, homeless shelters, park benches. These poor politicians suffer through meetings, fighting to stay awake because they only ate a can of beans all day. Try working several physically demanding jobs and not having a car to get to them. I could go on and on. And yes, I come from a place of privilege, so maybe it’s not my place to have this rant. I know what it’s like to worry if the rent cheque’s going to clear, but I’m fortunate enough to have family to spot me money to make the bills and to be able to eat well.

 

If we’re going to continue doing these low-budget style challenges then the participants should at least donate any money saved on food to a local food bank, shelter, or another poverty-related organization, such as End Poverty Now.