Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Dr Oz: regular dose of bull

A part of me says that I should stop blogging about terrible advice given by Dr Oz. I know that I’m largely preaching to the choir. However, as long as he keeps spewing incorrect, and potentially dangerous advice, I can’t help but hope that some of his devotees will stumble across my rantings and question his assertions. So… What has he done now? Check out this tweet:

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In the past, aloe vera latex was used to treat constipation. However, due to concerns about dependency, it was removed from the market in 2002 (1). Aloe vera juice may also be effective as a laxative (2); however, there are additional concerns (3) to take into consideration before making blanket recommendations. As many pregnant women suffer from constipation, I think that it’s important to mention that consumption of aloe vera (juice or gel or latex) is not recommended during pregnancy as there is a risk of uterine contractions.

Considering that there are numerous concerns surrounding the supplemental use of aloe vera, and many known safe and effective ways to improve regularity, the recommendation that people drink aloe juice daily to relieve constipation is baffling. Stick to the tried and true: increase fibre (through whole grains, seeds (such as ground flax and chia, legumes, fruits, and vegetables, and possibly a supplement) and water intake, try prune juice, exercise, coffee (if you are able to consume caffeine). Some medications and medical conditions may cause constipation. If this is something that you’re experiencing on a regular basis, you should check with your doctor to see if a medication can be changed or if there is an underlying condition causing your constipation.

 

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Why you should eat these 6 “fat-burning” snacks (clickbait)

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While Dr Oz is supposedly going to dial down his “enthusiasm” for useless weight loss supplements, it seems that he’s not going to dial down his enthusiasm for “fat-burning” foods. Sigh.

I wasn’t even going to blog about this post on his website. I didn’t even bother clicking through to see all of the magical “fat-burning snacks”. I mean, we all know that this is a load of bunk, right? Food will not “burn fat”. End of story.

Instead of going through each food in his list and saying why the claims that they are fat-burners are foolish, I’m going to go through each food and provide you with the real deal about them.

Figs

One large fresh fig is a good source of fibre (just shy of 2 grams). It’s also got some potassium, calcium, vitamin B6, and magnesium*. They’re also delicious.

Beans

Well, I don’t really know anyone who snacks on beans. Maybe some bean salad or chickpea blondies or something. Regardless, beans are one of the most underrated foods. One half cup of cooked kidney beans is an excellent source of fibre with over 5 grams and protein with over 7 grams! They’re also a great source of folate, vitamin K, thiamine, potassium, magnesium, iron, and more. They’re also very affordable and are a great meat alternative in a meal. If you buy dried beans, make sure that you soak them well, and change the water a few times before cooking to remove as many of the gas-causing oligosaccharides as possible. If you buy canned beans, make sure you rinse them well, for the same reason, and if there’s added salt, to remove up to 40% of the sodium.

Licorice

We’re not talking about candy here. We’re talking about pure licorice root. Which, according to Oz, is available at health food stores. It’s not something I’ve seen here. I can’t vouch for it as a tasty, nor as a healthy snack. In fact, there are some cautions against it as a dietary supplement for some individuals. It may increase blood pressure, lower potassium levels, and induce labour in pregnant women. Another case of the naturalistic fallacy. Just because a food/supplement is “natural” does not mean that it’s a wise or safe choice.

Watermelon

Ooh! I love watermelon! I don’t have air conditioning so my favourite way to cool off when my apartment gets hot in the summer is to snack on frozen watermelon cubes. It’s pretty much like eating sweet water with a few vitamins thrown in for good measure. One cup, is a great source of vitamin C and vitamin A. It’s also a source of potassium.

Pistachios

Another one that I love. Pistachios are easy to over-do though. Make sure you portion them out so you don’t wind-up eating the better part of a large bag in one sitting! One ounce is a great source of protein (6 grams), and fibre (just shy of 3 grams). They’re also a good source of Vitamin K, thiamine, Vitamin B6, folate, and lots of minerals; including, iron, magnesium, potassium, and copper.

Pine nuts

These suckers are expensive! Not something I can afford to snack on. I sometimes replace them in pesto with other nuts to save money. They’re also not that spectacular on their own so I wouldn’t waste my money (or my calories) snacking on them. That being said, one ounce contains just under 4 grams of protein, and are a good source of Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Niacin, iron, magnesium, zinc, and manganese (124% of the %DV!!!).

*I used SELF Nutrition Data for all of the nutrient information contained in this post


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Dr Oz gets schooled and says: #sorrynotsorry

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I’m sure that the whole Dr-Oz-goes-to-the-senate-and-gets-scolded thing is going to be all over all of the blogs for at least the next few days. Despite this, I still feel the need to throw my voice into the fray. I’ve ranted about Dr Oz and his ridiculous supplement (and dietary) proclamations many a time (too many for me to be bothered to even give you a link right now, feel free to search my blog for my scorn). It’s not just weight loss that’s a problem. It’s pretty much every dietary and supplement recommendation that he’s made. Eat a papaya every day? Come on, are we made of money (perhaps Dr Oz should read yesterdays post)? And what happened to variety is the spice of life. Any dietitian worthy of the “RD” after their name will tell you that variety is a key component of a healthy diet.

But that’s all history now, right? Dr Oz, the great and powerful Oz, has (gasp!) apologised for his role in the popularization of useless weight loss supplements. Does this really sound like the words of someone who is truly sorry: “For years I felt that because I did not sell any products that I could be enthusiastic in my coverage and I believe the research surrounding the products I cover has value.”? What I see here is Oz saying that by not putting his name on any product labels that he thought it was okay to tout each and every one of them as the next great MIRACLE weight loss cure on his show. Even more importantly, I see that Oz still believes in the “research” conducted on the products he promotes. Never mind that most of them have little to no scientific research to support their use as weight loss supplements. Never mind that those that do have research invariably have weak biased research. Never mind that he conducted his own “research” into the efficacy of green coffee bean extract using audience members.

Do I think that we’ll see any meaningful change as a result of this hearing? I doubt it. Dr Oz doesn’t believe that he’s done anything sincerely wrong and what he does is popular. Horrifyingly popular. Just a taste of some of the comments on his facebook “apology”:

Dr.Oz, you are amazing. You get people excited about living healthier and happier lives! You show is interesting, lively and is very enjoyable as well as more importantly very informative to watch. Thank you!!!

You have done far more good in your career than any other public medical professional, helping people take responsibility for their health and promoting preventive care and wellness. Don’t listen to the politicians, who are the MOST self-serving of our population and sell out every day to lobbying money. You owe no apologies.

You are a good doctor, and you have done nothing wrong. I am glad you stood up for what is right. Keep on doing what you do best Dr. Oz…
They go on and on in that vein. People want miracle cures. They don’t want to hear that losing weight (and keeping it off) is hard work. That’s why Dr Oz has 4.6 million likes on FB and a syndicated television show and dietitians (like yours truly) are tapping away writing unpaid blogs about nutrition in their spare time. As long as Dr Oz is being given a platform, as long as the network is getting the ratings, and as long as the public are swallowing every pill he proffers he is going to keep dishing them out.