Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Breathing vs raw food. Should we be getting our oxygen from our diet?

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Does everyone remember when that Australian “health coach” told everyone that cancer is actually good for you (see above)? And then everyone piled on and she relented and removed the post and made a sort-of apology video. I was thinking about that recently after reading this article about a naturopath in Montreal who espoused similar views in her blog. I decided to see what Olivia was up to these days on her Instagram.

Her most recent post was extolling the benefits of an “oxygen-rich diet”. According to her post, people who are oxygen deficient, “are nervous, stubborn, hypersensitive, and have an increased amount of bacterial and fungal infections, as well as disease. Low oxygen creates decreased brain function, congestion, bleeding, and a decrease in sexuality.” At this point you’re probably wondering if you’re oxygen deficient and how you can boost your oxygen levels through an oxygen–rich diet. I mean, nobody wants to be a diseased stubborn dim-wit. Fortunately, Olivia has the answer:

Raw foods are full of oxygen, especially dark green leafy vegetables which contain an abundance of chlorophyll. The chemical structure of chlorophyll is almost identical to the haemoglobin in our red blood cells. The only difference is that the haemoglobin molecule has iron in its nucleus and the chlorophyll molecule has magnesium. The bloodstream then delivers this oxygen to every cell in your body. When you eat greens in blended form, such as a smoothie, this process is even more efficient.

Naturally, this tome is accompanied by a sweet doe-eyed photo of Olivia holding a massive bowl of lettuce. Sadly, contrary to popular opinion, being young and pretty are not qualifications for providing nutrition advice.

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The subtext being that you too can become a more glowing, more vital, blonder bluer-eyed version of yourself if you follow her advice. Of course, none of it’s true.

Let’s start with oxygen deficiency. What is oxygen deficiency? Could we all be silently suffering from insufficient oxygen in our blood? Oxygen deficiency is when your body doesn’t get enough oxygen. This can be caused by health conditions such as asthma, COPD and other lung diseases, and anemia. Most of these are treated with medications and/or supplemental oxygen. Of these, only anemia can be related to diet (more on that later). It’s important to note that when your body doesn’t get enough oxygen you may experience hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) which can quickly lead to hypoxia (low tissue oxygen) which can result in symptoms such as changes in skin colour, coughing, wheezing, confusion, and shortness of breath. It’s important to seek immediate medical attention if this should occur as organ damage can occur within minutes of the onset of symptoms. In other words, a salad is not the recommended course of treatment.

Okay, back to anemia. While there are many forms of anemia with many causes, anemia is when your body doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen to your organs. Among the many causes of anemia are iron deficiency and vitamin deficiency (B12 or folate). Generally, if you have reached the point of anemia you’ll need supplements to adequately increase your levels (as always, this blog is not to be taken as medical advice and if you think you may be experiencing anemia you should consult with your doctor). To obtain sufficient quantities of these nutrients it’s important to include food sources of them in your diet. Iron-rich foods include: meat, fish, poultry, legumes, eggs, tofu, spinach, and marmite. The form of iron found in plant-based foods is not as readily absorbed by the body as that found in animal foods. Consuming these foods with vitamin C rich foods can help to increase the absorption. Natural sources of vitamin B12 are only found in animal foods (and nutritional yeast). These include: yoghurt, meat, fish, eggs, and cheese. So far, most of these foods are very different from those Olivia is recommending. Finally, folate is found in dark green leafy vegetables, legumes, and fortified flour (in Canada). These foods may help to increase your blood oxygen levels if your red blood cells are low by increasing the hemoglobin in your blood. There is no direct relationship between consumption of “oxygen-rich” foods and oxygen levels in your blood. The metabolic process is not that simple and the quantity of oxygen that you would consume from food is minuscule in comparison to the quantity of oxygen you obtain from breathing.

This all to say, eating a variety of foods including many plant-based foods can form the basis of a healthy diet but that has nothing to do with the amount of oxygen in said foods.

I’ll leave you with the one sensible comment on the post:

danielparasiliti I think you are getting confused… someone who is oxygen deficient Is not stubborn… but more than likely unconscious or dead…

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Blog by request: folate

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Lacking in blogspiration, I went back through my inbox and realised that I had a few topic suggestions that I’d never written about. While this isn’t my usually ranting hopefully it will be useful information to some!

So… folate/folic acid, what is it?

Folate refers to the generic name for the vitamin as well as the various forms found naturally in foods. Folic acid is the form of the vitamin found in supplements and fortified foods. Naturally occurring folate usually has additional glutamate molecules attached that can reduce absorption as they need to be removed before the folic acid can be absorbed in the intestine.

What does folic acid do?

The main reason that the government introduced mandatory fortification of white flour with folic acid is due to the role it plays in preventing neural tube defects in infants. While prenatal vitamins contain folic acid many women don’t begin taking them until after they learn that they’re pregnant. This is often too late to promote proper neural tube development. However, as bread and other refined grains are widely consumed, the government decided to have it added to most refined grain products.

Folic acid plays an important role in DNA synthesis and repair as well as in the formation of neurotransmitters. It’s also involved in amino acid metabolism and blood pressure normalization.

How much folate do I need?

The RDA (recommended Dietary Allowance) for adults is 400 mcg a day. However, about 10% of the North American population has a defect in folate metabolism and may need up to twice the RDA to compensate. The RDA is based on the amount of folate needed to maintain normal blood concentrations as well as to prevent neural tube defects during fetal development.

Where do I get folate?

As mentioned above, most refined grain products and flours are fortified with folic acid. This includes breakfast cereals and dried pasta. Foods naturally containing folate include dark leafy greens (e.g. asparagus, spinach, romain lettuce, broccoli, brussels sprouts, and kale), lentils, peas (black-eyed peas, chickpeas), beans, turnips, beets, orange juice, sunflower seeds, avocado, edamame, okra, artichoke, potatoes, papaya, marmite and vegemite, and everyone’s faves: fried liver and brewer’s yeast.

This list, while extensive, may not include all food sources of folate. You can search for food items using the USDA Nutrient Database to find out how much folate they contain. Yes, Canada has a similar database but I’m not confident it’s entirely up to date and I find it  little bit more frustrating to use.

What happens if I don’t get enough?

Folate deficiency can result from low intake, inadequate absorption (often due to alcoholism), increased need (often due to pregnancy), poor utilization (often due to vitamin B12 deficiency), excessive excretion (often due to long-standing diarrhea), and the use of certain chemotherapy medications.

One of the first signs of folate deficiency is a form of anemia called megaloblastic anemia. It may also result in persistent diarrhea and decreased immune function.

If insufficient folate is consumed or absorbed during the first 28 days of pregnancy there is an increased risk of the infant experiencing neural tube defects (i.e. spina bifida or anencephaly).

Can I get too much folate?

The upper level for synthetic folic acid is set at 1000 mcg due to its ability to mask B12 deficiency when consumed in high doses. There is no upper level given for folate naturally occurring in foods as absorption is limited.