Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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How to choose yoghurt (#FF @canva)

Choosing Yogurt

Do you like the infographic I made? It’s pretty simplified (but that’s what infographics are supposed to be, right?). I know that the yoghurt (or yogurt if you’re anyone else in North America besides me) aisle can be overwhelming so I made this little guy to help you navigate it.

That’s where the Follow Friday came in. I used Canva which was totally free and very easy to work with. If you’re looking to make a simple infographic and don’t have the funds to pay a graphic designer I definitely recommend checking them out.

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Step away from the chips, the grocery store RD is watching you

Not my usual uniform, I swear!

Not my usual uniform, I swear!

A couple of weeks ago the Globe and Mail published an article about the role of “nutrition experts” in grocery stores. It caused a bit of an uproar in the dietitian community for a couple of reasons: one, there was some conflation between nutritionists, dietitians, and naturopaths (if you don’t know why that would upset dietitians then you should read this); two, it poorly represented our roles in grocery stores. Following that, a dietitian published a blog in Huff Post in response to the inflammatory article in the Globe. As a dietitian who worked in a grocery store for several years and who was interview for, and quoted in, the original Globe article I feel obligated to add my belated two cents to the fray.

I actually had a really nice interview with Shawna, we covered a number of topics, and I felt like she was “getting” what I was saying. So, I was a little disappointed when I read the article and saw the quotes that she had chosen. Not to mention that I had asked that grocery retailer I worked for not be identified as employees cannot speak as representatives of the company, a normal PR policy, my job was not “retail dietitian”. I was a Wellbeing Counsellor, and as part of the interview I explained the different roles of the Wellbeing Counsellor and the in-store Dietitian. Wellbeing Counsellors essentially manage the Natural Source and Wellbeing Department in one store (ordering, stocking shelves, inventory, checking for out dates, dumping expired milk…). In addition, they are there to assist customers with any food, supplement, or nutrition-related question they might have. They also teach classes, do demos, and perform community outreach. The in-store Dietitian teaches classes, does demos, store tours, community outreach, and one-on-one counselling. They’re not tied to one department and they usually split their time between two stores.

In retrospect, Shawna was trying to push the helicopter parent/food police angle a bit, and I found it odd when she brought up orthorexia. While I agreed that many people are taking healthy eating to a whole new disordered level of “clean” eating, I suggested that dietitians (I’m now talking about those of us in both Wellbeing Counsellor and Dietitian roles) working in grocery stores can actually serve to combat this. I said that the food industry, the media, and society have made healthy eating far more complicated than it has to be. Dietitians in grocery stores can help you to look past the front-of-package label claims to the true nutritional value of a foods. They can help you make healthier, more delicious choices. They’re not there peering into your cart and judging what you’re eating. They’re not there to push products on you. No one ever told me to sell more of X or Y and as a regulated health professional I would never have done any such thing. Yes, obviously, grocery stores hire us to boost sales but it’s not by pushing products, it’s by having value-added service; by showing customers what they can do with chia seeds or by helping them find the product that’s best going to meet their needs.

When I said that comment about how people often think that dietitians only eat salad (and that we don’t, sometimes we eat candy or chips) it seemed to be met with some surprise. Especially when I insisted that I’m not in the minority; that most dietitians I know would say the same thing. That it’s important to eat a variety of foods and to allow yourself to have treats. I actually hate the term clean eating and am still hoping that my #eatdirty hashtag will catch on. If you’re not enjoying your food then you’re doing it wrong.


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Coke gives the green light to traffic light nutrition labelling

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Apparently Coke is going to adopt the “traffic light” front -of-package labelling in the UK. For those who are unfamiliar, this labelling scheme uses red, yellow, and green lights to help customers make healthy choices quickly.

I can’t help but wonder how Coke is going to have anything besides red on their beverages. If they’re able to, it’s a testament to the fact that you can’t always trust labels. After all, the absence of unhealthy ingredients (as in the instance of diet pop) doesn’t mean it’s healthy as there’s still an absence of healthy ingredients.

 

Shameless request for your support: The Coast is currently doing their Best of Halifax Awards Poll and I’d love your vote for best blogger! Just go here to register your vote and get a chance to win a $1, 000 shopping spree at Mic Mac Mall!


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Why you should read the ingredients

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A couple of weeks ago, a study of packaged foods in the US showed that many of them listing 0% trans-fat on the labels actually still contained trans-fat. Many dietitians said, “No shit”. This is why reading the ingredients is often more valuable than reading the nutrition facts panel.

Many manufacturers use trans-fat in their food products but also use a serving size that allows them to report the amount of trans-fat per serving as being 0%. Until trans-fats are banned, what can you do about this? One, you can read the ingredient list. Look for the words “partially hydrogenated”. That’s your trans-fat. Avoid foods containing any partially hydrogenated ingredients. Two, make your own food. When you make it yourself you can decide what goes into your food. Use as few highly-processed packaged foods as possible. I know that it’s not realistic to expect that everyone is going to start cooking and baking everything at home. Be savvy. Do what you can. Aim for packaged foods with as few ingredients as possible. And remember that while you may be saving time in the short-term by buying frozen dinners, you’ll likely lose time in the long-run.


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Nutrition labels are getting a makeover – Have your say!

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Big news announcement from Health Canada yesterday: proposed new nutrition label guidelines are available for viewing and input

For once, I think that Health Canada is heading in the right direction with these labels. The key (proposed) changes are:

Improved new serving size guidelines

This will ensure that similar products will have to use similar serving sizes; thus, making comparisons easier. For example, all bread will have to use two slices as the serving size, and all yoghurt will have to use 175 grams. Of course, you’ll still have to do some math if the amount you normally eat differs from the serving size used on the package, but at least you won’t have to do algebra to determine which tub of yoghurt is the healthier choice. One thing I wonder about this change for the yoghurt is how it will affect those “single serve” tubs that are only 100 grams. Will they have to list their nutrition information as 175 grams? So you’ll still have to do math if you’re not planning on eating 1 and 3/4 tubs of yoghurt? I also wonder about products that currently list serving sizes that don’t match with what you would actually eat. For example, I’ve seen some packages of “bites” that contain 5 bites but the serving size is based on 1/6th of the package. I hope that this is something that will no longer be allowed when the new guidelines are approved.

Improved sugar disclosure

I love that they are proposing listing all sugars (e.g. fructose, honey, rice syrup, glucose, evaporated cane juice, etc) together in parentheses on the label following the listing of “sugar”. Of course, this will make it more difficult to determine where (based on weight) the different forms of sugar fall in the list but it helps prevent the current sneaky tactic by food manufacturers of putting in multiple types of sugar scattered throughout the ingredient list. I can’t help but wonder how they’ll address the issue of sneaky sweeteners like fruit puree and fruit juice concentrate. I hope that they’ll list those along-side the other sugars and that they’ll count them in the new “added sugars” line on the nutrition facts panel. I worry that this may be a bit of a loophole for food manufacturers trying to healthwash their products if it’s not required to be listed as sugar.

I’m not sure how I feel about the application of the “5% is a little, 15% is a lot” guide to Daily Values in relation to sugar, and other nutrients. Health Canada uses 100 grams (about 25 teaspoons) of sugar as the amount to calculate the percent daily value. I think that many people look at the %DV as an amount to shoot for. In some cases this is true. In others, it’s more of a maximum (e.g. sodium), and in others, a minimum (e.g. vitamin D). The current figures used for the %DV are also outdated and it’s great to see that Health Canada is proposing that we update those.

Appearance of the Nutrition Facts panel and ingredients list

There’s nothing really wrong with the new design. I definitely like what they’re proposing for the ingredients list. However, I would like to see the Nutrition Facts panel in a different sequence. I’d prefer to see the macronutrients (fat, protein, and carbohydrate) in the upper panel (i.e. directly underneath the calories), with any relevant breakdown directly beneath. I think that the sugar, added sugar, and fibre should all be listed under the carbohydrate header. Listing the trans and saturated fat under the fat header is good but maybe we could go a step further and add mono- and poly-unsaturated fat as well.

Micronutrients of concern should be listed in the second section of the panel. I’m not sure about cholesterol and sodium. Dietary cholesterol really isn’t all that relevant; sodium definitely is for many people though. I think that they should either be lumped in with the micronutrients or placed in their own section. I know that we can’t include every micronutrient, and I love the addition of potassium, but I question the removal of vitamins A and C (1). Most Canadians don’t meet their needs for magnesium either so I think that this might be a useful nutrient to add. With the increased popularity of sea salt I wonder if it might be prudent to add iodine to the panel. I’m going to stop there before I disappear down a micronutrient wormhole.

It’s important to note that these are proposed changes. If you want these changes to happen, or if you want to see additional or different changes you need to provide your input to Health Canada (first link in this post).