Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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You won’t need a meal plan in the nanny state

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You know what I find ironic? And not Alanis ironic, which is really just crap luck, but genuinely ironic. How vehemently opposed to government “interference” in their lives many people are and how many people ask me to give them meal plans. I’ve had people say to me “just tell me what to eat” (if you’d like to know why I don’t do that, check out this old post). Which is voluntarily completely relinquishing control of what they put in their mouths and people are willing to pay for this service. Yet, people rail on and on about the “nanny state” and how the government should stay out of our kitchens when all public health wants to do is help make it easier for you to make healthier choices.

No one in government wants to tell you exactly what to eat at every meal. Through legislation public health dietitians would like to make nutritionally void foods (like pop and candy) less accessible. We would like to ensure that fast food joints can’t open across the street from schools so that your children aren’t eating shakes and fries every day. We would like to make sure that local food systems are strengthened so that farmers are making living wages and produce is affordable and accessible.

Unlike what people want from a meal plan, we want to make it easy for people to make healthy choices. We don’t want to forbid you from buying pop or chips, we just want to make it easier for you to buy carrots or to fill-up your water bottle.

Why is it that people are so ready to relinquish all control over their diets to a dietitian or nutritionist but when it comes to creating an environment in which making healthy choices would be easier suddenly everyone’s all up in arms?

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Universal nutrition documentary review

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Do you care about food and nutrition? Do you want to learn more about what you’re putting in your body? Where you food comes from? How it’s killing us all and destroying the planet? Then this is the film for you.

I really enjoyed the way that the film makers turned their opinions into facts by interviewing “experts” for their documentary. It was refreshing to see that no experts were brought in to provide an alternate viewpoint as they were presenting only indisputable facts. Seeing these effusive self-styled experts with no credentials to speak of, or expertise in a vaguely related field left me feeling empowered to start my own wellness guru enterprise.

After eating gluten/wheat/grains/sugar/dairy/food for all of my life I found it incredibly eye opening to learn that I may as well have been mainlining heroin or injecting fat directly into my organs and veins. Why is big dietetics/pharma/food trying to hide this from us? The people have a right to know that they’re feeding their children toxins hidden in the guise of sandwiches.

The manipulative use of innocent children along with the soundtrack and cinematography really drove home the horror of the food we eat every day. It’s always nice to see film makers preying on our fears and manipulating our emotions to sell their agendas.

Without having seen this film I would have foolishly continued to eat gluten/wheat/grains/sugar/dairy/food and lived my life never having known that I was regularly ingesting deadly substances. Thank goodness it came up in my Netflix recommendations. Now I can be sure to preach the follies of eating gluten/wheat/grains/sugar/dairy/food to anyone who makes the mistake of speaking to me in the lunch room, on social media, or who stands nearby me in the grocery store. So many lives to save.


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Follow Friday: @HealthCanada consultations

TGIF fellow Canucks and happy early Canada Day!

Want to contribute to helping to make our country healthier? Now’s your chance to have your say. Health Canada has a couple of consultations open until July 25th.

Not a fan of Canada’s Food Guide? Make it better. Give your feedback on the new healthy eating recommendations at foodguideconsultation.ca. I know that I had lots to say but lucky for you, I can’t remember it anymore so you’re on your own.

Think we should stop marketing to kids? I sure do. Give your feedback at healthyeatingconsultations.ca. Pretty much every response I gave was that they should not allow any marketing to kids. I approve of the age range they give (17 and under) but I don’t think that the ban goes far enough. Marketing of “healthy” foods is problematic as it can promote overeating. It also raises the issue of how to appropriately define healthy. I definitely don’t agree with the proposal to allow marketing of things like goldfish crackers and potato chips and french fries – WTF Health Canada!? For more about my thoughts on marketing healthy foods to kids check out this older blog post. For more about marketing to kids in general, check out stopmarketingtokids.ca. Also, I love the campaign by Irish Heart. The video at the start of this post is just one of their great ads.


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Will avocado toast truly be society’s downfall?

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A couple of news items last week got me wondering when it became elitist to eat healthfully. The first was an article about Trump’s dietary predilections. The article talked about how his fast food requests were catered to and mentioned Obama’s “seven lightly salted almonds” and how he was “very disciplined with food”. The subtext here being that Trump is more akin to the “average Joe, salt of the earth American” while Obama fancies himself better than the rest of us. I don’t actually think that this was the intended message of the article, but I think that it helps to demonstrate the strange socially fraught world of food we’ve created for ourselves. A world in which healthy eating is considered a luxury that only the “elites” can afford.

The second item that tied in nicely with this was the outrage generated by a billionaire telling Millennials that the reason they can’t afford houses is their avocado toast habit. As if eating toast with mashed avocado is a huge money sucking vice that all Millennials are guilty of. Full disclosure: I am not a Millennial, nor am I a home owner, and I do enjoy the occasional serving of avocado toast. Anyway, of all the things to get hung-up on, this guy chooses avocado freaking toast?? If a slice of bread with a bit of fruit (yes, avocado is a fruit) on it is the common vice of Millennials than I’d say they’re doing pretty damn good compared to previous generations with their cigarettes and alcohol. We’re really going to highlight a relatively benign, fairly healthy breakfast food as the downfall of a generation? What would you have them eat? Dry cornflakes? There’s a lot more ranting I could get into about the fallacies of the argument but I’d be digressing and I’m fairly certain others have already voiced them all in rebuttals and on social media. More to the point, yet again, we’re seeing healthy eating being framed as elitist, something that needs to be earned, rather than the human right that it is.

As with placing moral value on food, we should not begrudge anyone a nutritious diet. Healthy food is not synonymous with elitism. Nor is it something to be earned with age or money. Everyone of all ages, financial circumstances, and walks of life, has a right to healthy food. And just to be clear, that doesn’t mean everyone has to, or should, eat avocado toast.


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A recommended detox for @bonappetit

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I think that Bon Appetit is trolling me now. Why else would they come out with another article about detoxing?? This one about “How Chefs Diet When They Need to Hit the Reset Button” with the subheading: “If you’re going to detox, might as well do it like a chef”. No no no. Would you please cut it out with all the detox bullshit Bon Appetit. I read you for recipes, not for terrible health and nutrition advice. If I wanted that, I would be reading Goop.

What’s my issue here? Well, one: detoxes are a misguided waste of effort (and often money). You are not going to remove toxins from your system by drinking green juice. Your body is equipped to regularly remove toxins from your body through a finely tuned system involving your kidneys and liver. Any toxins remaining in your body are not going to be removed through fasting, juice, laxatives, etc.

Two: why would a chef be uniquely qualified to provide advice on “detoxing”? What training do chefs have on human physiology? Perhaps this lack of knowledge is precisely why some of them are needlessly detoxing and willing to contribute to a ridiculous piece, rife with misinformation, on how chefs detox.

What these chefs are doing is not detoxing, it’s crash dieting. I can understand why the notion that we can put unhealthy foods in our bodies most of the time and then remedy that through a day or week of dietary penance would be appealing. Most people would probably like to eat whatever they wanted most of the time and forsake vegetables for bacon. Unfortunately, that’s not the way the human body works. You can’t just fill yourself with nutrient void foods most of the time, starve yourself, and expect that to balance everything out. Fortunately, nutritious foods can be delicious. You don’t have to choose between flavour and health. You can follow a balanced diet all of the time and skip the unnecessary detoxes.

Bon Appetit, I know that you’re a food magazine so perhaps you’re not aware that detoxing is bullshit and that you’re sharing terrible advice. The trouble is, you have a huge readership who look to you for foodspiration and by publishing drivel like this you’re potentially doing them harm. In the future, I request that you kindly detox yourselves from writing about detoxing.