Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Doctors giving nutrition advice probably shouldn’t reference Pete Evans

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I saw this article last week and had mixed feelings about it. I know that we were all supposed to read it and be horrified that a doctor was reprimanded for giving patients nutrition advice. After all, shouldn’t doctors be doing more to help patients manage their health through lifestyle changes? But… there’s so much that this article doesn’t tell us.

Just to start by clearing the air, obviously you all know that I’m a dietitian. Of course I’m going to feel a little defensive of my profession. The orthopaedic surgeon in question was undermining recommendations given by dietitians at the hospital where he worked. All because he had studied some nutrition on his own. Can you even imagine the outrage that would occur if the tables were turned and a dietitian undermined advice given by a doctor?! I’m certain that the RD would lose her (or his) licence, not just be given a slap on the wrist and told to stop working outside the scope of their practice.

Everyone think that they’re experts in nutrition simply because they eat (yes that’s hyperbole, please don’t send me your #notalleaters comments). So many people believe that doctors are all knowing. Unfortunately, it would seem that some doctors fall prey to this mode of thought as well. Doctors specialize. A doctor who works in oncology is going to have an entirely different knowledge-base and skill set from a doctor who works in neurosurgery. Doctors should not be expected to know everything. Yes, family doctors should be better equipped to provide nutrition advice but an orthopaedic surgeon should defer to the dietitians on-staff. It takes an incredibly high level of self regard to believe that you are more of an expert in a field in which you did a little self-study than a regulated health professional who studied the subject for over four years, is immersed in it on the job, and who must complete on-going education to maintain their credentials.

There’s some amazing irony in the article as well. The author references a television episode with the doctor in question and celebrity chef Pete Evans. For those who are unaware, Evans is a notorious charlatan and has faced entirely warranted criticism for promoting unsafe infant diets amongst other questionable nutrition practices. A few paragraphs down, the author goes on to say:

In addition there are numerous unqualified “gurus” giving advice about what we should and should not be eating. Surely it is preferable to have a doctor giving nutrition advice rather than unqualified individuals, many of whom have a product or program to sell.

Um HELLO??? Pete Evans is the epitome of the unqualified guru with a product to sell. Just prior to this statement, the author even admitted that the majority of doctors receive very little formal nutrition education. So, no. It’s not preferable to have a wholly unqualified doctor providing nutrition advice to people. In a way, it’s worse than having a self-proclaimed “guru” providing nutrition advice because people trust their doctors.

If the doctors referred to in the article truly cared about the well-being of their patients they would refer to appropriate professionals when needed, including registered dietitians. They should also work together with those professionals to provide the best care possible for their patients. Rather than assuming that they have superior knowledge of a subject which they were not adequately trained in.

How about rather than complaining foul when someone is rightly called-out for practicing outside their scope of practice, we talk about the real problem here. That our healthcare system is designed to treat illness rather than prevent it from developing in the first place.


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21 easy food swaps that will totally leave you feeling like you’re missing out

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Image “Vegemite for Sue” by mobil’homme on flickr, used under a Creative Commons licence.

A couple of RDs I know on twitter shared the this post recently and deemed it “food wankery”. An apt description. Let me fix that for you…

21 “easy” food swaps you can make now without missing out

  1. Sugar. Swap it for rice malt syrup less sugar. Sugar by any other name (including rice malt syrup) is still sugar. Try to avoid sugary drinks and keep sweet treats actual treats.
  2. Vegetable oil. Swap it for coconut oil what ever type of oil you prefer when cooking. Coconut oil does have a higher smoke point than most other oils making it a good choice for higher heats. However, it’s also very expensive. Use the oil that you prefer, can afford, and have on-hand. Despite what you may have heard, coconut oil is not a miracle food and “oil pulling” is bullshit but can be done with any type of oil. It’s important to consume a variety of types of fats so don’t toss your EVOO and butter and use coconut oil for all of your cooking; switch it up.
  3. White flour. Swap it for gluten free flour alternative <if you have celiac disease>. Most gluten free flours are far more expensive than white flour and don’t provide the same texture. It’s true that white flour isn’t the healthiest thing you can eat but refined gluten free flours are on-par with white flour or even less nutritious as they may not be enriched. Unless you have celiac disease there’s no reason to go gluten-free just make sure you’re consuming a variety of grains and that the majority of your servings are whole grain.
  4. White rice. Swap it for quinoa brown and wild rice mixes. Brown rice has more fibre and nutrients than white rice as it’s simply less refined white rice. Quinoa is not as protein-rich as the superfood marketers would have you believe. Sure, it’s great to switch it up but quinoa is another super expensive food.
  5. White wine vinegar. Swap for apple cider vinegar depending on the recipe. Unpasturized apple cider vinegar contains probiotics in the sediment (aka “the mother”) which may be beneficial. However, the flavour of apple cider vinegar may not always work for the recipe that you’re making and the small amount that you consume in a dressing is unlikely to provide any substantial health benefit.
  6. Wheat crackers. Swap for seed and vege crackers/snaps whole grain crackers. Seed and veg are fine but most crackers that contain them are still white flour based with a smattering or seeds or vegetables. Look for crackers with minimal ingredients and whole grains. You can also find some great legume based crackers and tortilla chips in stores now.
  7. Commercial muesli. Swap for rolled oats mixed with nuts, spices and organic dried fruits or simply fresh fruits. Okay, this isn’t a bad suggestion, although commercial muesli doesn’t usually have much added sugar anyway; most of it comes from the dried fruit.
  8. Commercial chocolate. Swap for raw fair trade chocolate. If you can find/afford/enjoy raw chocolate then go for it. If you enjoy “commercial” chocolate go for it. Try to choose fair trade so that the farmers get appropriately reimbursed.
  9. Wheat pasta. Swap for rice, buckwheat, quinoa or legume based pasta whole grain pasta. Choose whole grain for more fibre. Other pastas can also be good sources of fibre but many gluten-free options are actually lower in fibre. Read the labels and choose the best option that you enjoy.
  10. Packet muesli bars. Swap for a small handful of nuts and seeds, bliss balls — or bake your own or choose fresh fruit, hummus, veg, there are many snack options. What the heck are “bliss balls” anyway?! Something pretentious packed full of super expensive ingredients no doubt.
  11. Vegemite. Swap for a mix of tamari and tahini. I don’t have a suggested swap for this one either. Although one of my tweeps suggested “the inside of a trashcan” – haters gonna hate. Yes, vegemite is high in sodium (173 mg in 5 g) considering the quantity in one serving. It’s also a good source of B vitamins and consumed in small quantities occasionally there’s little harm in that. Switch it up with natural nut and seed butters.
  12. Table salt. Swap for sea salt or Himalayan crystal salt herbs and spices. Sea salt is no better for you than table salt. Try seasoning your food with herbs, lemon zest, and spices to cut back on sodium.
  13. Bottled sauces. Swap for simple combinations of fresh or dried herbs and spices to season foods. This is also acceptable. However, you can find healthy bottled sauces in a pinch. Look for no-salt-added options or better yet, make your own.
  14. Instant coffee. swap for freshly brewed plunger coffee, green tea or dandelion tea real coffee. Sorry, I’m a coffee snob. You should not be drinking instant coffee. Go for ANY OTHER coffee.
  15. Poppers. Swap for fresh vegetable juices or smoothies. fruit. I don’t know what poppers are but whole fruit is better than juice. Home made smoothies can also be a good choice as long as you’re not adding juice or sugar. Sweeten with frozen banana chunks.
  16. Soft drinks. Swap for sparkling water with lemon, lime, orange or pomegranate. This is also a good suggestion. I’ve been loving the Blue Menu sparkling waters this summer.
  17. Peanut butter. Swap for pure nut butter or a natural peanut butter without added vegetable oils. Choose peanut butters and other nut and seed butters without any ingredients besides nuts. There’s unnecessary added sugar, salt, and fat in most peanut butters. Beware of labels that proclaim “natural” that aren’t just peanuts.
  18. Nutella. Swap for raw cacao mixed with almond butter, or make your own with roasted hazelnuts, raw cacao, maple and coconut milk. it really depends what you’re using it for. We all know that Nutella is delicious but not nutritious. If you’re having a spread on toast go for a nut or seed butter unless you want to turn it into a chocolate bar. However, if you’re having an occasional treat or using it in a baked good unless you’re ambitious enough to make your own healthier version then a little’s not such a big deal.
  19. Potato chips. Swap for rice crackers <and a feeling of utter dissatisfaction and excessive consumption of other foods>. I’m sorry but I don’t know anyone who is satisfied by rice crackers when they’re craving potato chips. If you are, power to ya. If you’re like most other human beings, and you’re craving potato chips then allow yourself to have a small portion, don’t eat straight from a large bag. If you have a microwave you can make your own healthier portion-controlled potato chips.
  20. Cookies. Swap for bliss balls or bars. Again with the bliss balls. Are these akin to rocky mountain oysters? I won’t lie, sometimes I made energy balls for a snack but cookies are a whole other thing. Cookies are a treat. They’re not sustenance to get you through the sleepy morning hours between breakfast and lunch. If you want a cookie, go for it, preferably homemade, fresh from the oven. A “bliss ball” is unlikely to satisfy that craving and it’s better to have a little of what you want than a whole bunch of other random foods to try to fill that cookie sized hole in your tummy.
  21. Sweetened dried fruits. Swap for organic unsweetened dried fruit or fresh fruit. Unless you’re one of the few people who is sensitive to sulphites in dried fruit there’s no need to avoid dried fruit in order to avoid sulphites. Avoid sweetened dried fruit because dried fruit is already full of sugar as the sugar in fresh fruit becomes concentrated in dried fruit. Because dried fruit is sticky and full of sugar it’s also a great promoter of dental caries. If you do choose dried fruit you should have only a small portion, try to pair it with something like nuts or cheese, and be sure to brush your teeth after.

You don’t have to swap the foods that you enjoy for expensive pretentious foods to be healthy. Try to eat healthy foods that you enjoy 80% of the time and really savour those treats the other 20%.