Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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The day the Internet dies

Sometimes I think that we would all be so much better off if the Internet collapsed. Or at the very least, social media networks.

I was reading this article: The Death of Civility in the Digital Age¬†that Yoni Freedhoff shared on his blog last week and thinking about how true it is. People are so ready to attack, always looking for a fight, on social media. The interaction of your fingers with your computer or mobile phone sending out words to someone you’ve probably never even met irl is vastly different from having a conversation with someone face-to-face, or even over the phone. It’s so easy to respond hastily and to neglect to consider that your words will be read by a real actual live human.

While I love that I can find the answer to nearly any question immediately on a tiny computer I carry in my purse I find myself more and more often wondering if it’s worth the cost we’re paying. Egregious cellphone bills in Canada aside, I mean what we’re paying in declining humanity and rampant misinformation.

I can find the answer to nearly any question online but anyone can put what they believe to be the answer out there. This means, especially in the world of nutrition, that there can be heaps of misleading, inaccurate, and completely false information that I need to sift through and assess before I come to the correct answer. There is an ever growing mountain of misinformation online and a tide of dietary dogma on social media. It’s ever so tempting to just shut it out but I feel an obligation to stay online to fight it, to try to dilute it with as much truth as I can. Which is hard because there aren’t many hard and fast truths when it comes to a balanced diet, despite what the radical carnivores, vegans, ketoites (I don’t know what they call themselves), LCHF-ists, HCLF-ists, etc etc would have you believe.

I also hate the constant need for self-promotion. I’m reading the novel Radiant Shimmering Light right now and the whole obsession with getting likes on IG, and RTs on Twitter really rings true. There are a few characters in the book who are “lifestyle” bloggers and they present these varnished, edited versions of their lives as currency. They make money through links on their websites and through selling the idea of perfection and self-marketing. The book is kind of poking fun at this world we’ve created but it’s done so in a way that you really feel the anxiety-provoking compulsion of the narrator to check her notifications. It’s nearly impossible for a dietitian, especially one in private practice, to not use social media. There are dietitians who make a living by coaching others on how to optimize their Instagram feeds. Like are you even a dietitian if you’re not posting perfectly styled photos of acai smoothie bowls and kale salads?

Our years of nutrition education and proof of ongoing education are no longer enough. Now we must be savvy social media marketers, chefs, expert food stylists, and photographers. We must be brands in and of ourselves. We must constantly be competing with self-styled nutrition gurus, other dietitians, and ourselves. I know that I’ve probably got my rose-coloured glasses on, but I yearn for a day when I don’t have to see literal meatheads mocking people for eating plants on twitter. When I can be blissfully unaware of the insane dietary advice naturopaths and some chiropractors are doling out to their clients. When I don’t have to see dietitians promoting juice as nutritious.¬† When we can all just stay in our lanes and do the jobs we were trained to do.