Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


4 Comments

Is Canada’s Food Guide making us fat?

Oh goodie. Nina Teicholz is at it again (still at it?). In an article in the National Post the other day she purportedly claimed that the cause of obesity in Canada is our strong adherence to Canada’s Food Guide.

See, that might be a remotely good argument if Canadians were actually following Canada’s Food Guide (even then, the causal relationship is unlikely). However, we’re not. Not even close. Only one quarter of the population (two years of age and over) met the minimum recommendation for vegetables and fruit according to one study. Similar results are consistently found through the CCHS (Canadian Community Health Survey administered by Stats Canada). We don’t eat enough vegetables and fruit, we don’t get enough milk (or alternatives), we eat too much meat…

Even if it were true that we were all following Canada’s Food Guide there are significant flaws with this logic. One, it’s a spurious correlation. You know, like the correlation between the number of people tripping over their own feet and dying and the number of lawyers in Nevada.

number-of-people-who-tripped-over-their-own-two-feet-and-died_number-of-lawyers-in-nevada

Just because two things happen to correlation doesn’t mean that there’s a connection between them. Just because obesity rates have been rising since the latest incarnation of CFG doesn’t mean that the CFG caused the rise in obesity.

Two, what about the rising obesity rates across the planet? Does Teicholz mean to suggest that Brits, Americans, and Australians are all strictly adhering to the Canadian Food Guide? Who knew our guide was so popular!?

Three, obesity rates were quite likely rising before we adopted Canada’s Food Guide. Both in Canada, and around the world. It’s impossible to say what the trend in obesity would have been if Canada’s Food Guide hadn’t been adopted in the 1980s. It’s possible that the trajectory would have been the same. Maybe it would have been even more rapid, slower, or dropped. There’s probably no causal relationship between the adoption of our national food guide and the increase in obesity rates.

Fortunately, there’s a voice of reason. Unfortunately, it comes in at the end of the article (after most people have likely stopped reading). Lyons says what I’ve said all too often, that we shouldn’t be demonizing or glorifying any foods. Rather than go all-in on saturated fat, we should be consuming fat from a variety of sources (save for man-made trans-fat). Rather than go from low-fat to high-fat we should consume a variety of foods. Let’s not sweat the small stuff so much.


1 Comment

Of strawmen in food swamps who exclusively eat carrots

The Statist Guide to Healthy Eating in the National Post last week had me all like:

imgres

Maybe the author, Soupcoff, was trying to be inflammatory. In that case, she certainly succeeded.

Recent news has come out about so-called “food swamps” in Toronto. These swamps are areas that are plentiful in less nutritious food options and lacking in things like grocery stores and farmers markets where fresh, minimally processed foods can be purchased.

Soupcoff argued creating policies and zoning to promote healthy eating is ridiculous; as is the notion of a “food swamp” in the first place. Instead of creating places where the healthy choice is the easy choice we should just be teaching people how to make healthy choices.

According to Soupcoff, “If we want people to eat healthier, treating them as grown-ups and giving facts is probably going to be far more effective than elaborate zoning plans to engineer equal kale distribution.” Sorry, nope. If people are surrounded by food options that aren’t very nutritious then they’re far more likely to choose those options on a regular basis than if they’re surrounded by healthy food options. I certainly believe that most people could benefit from greater nutrition education. However, for people to make healthier choices we need to be redesigning our environments so that those healthier choices are easier to make. Kale or no kale.

Soupcoff then goes off on a tangent, bringing in a strawman, to tell us that people who exclusively consume carrots are less healthy than people who consume a balanced varied diet and an occasional chocolate bar. As if this has anything to do with making healthy food choices easily available to all.

Interestingly, Soupcoff is the National Director for the Canadian Constitution Foundation. A far-right-wing organization that supposedly fights for the freedoms of Canadians. Apparently, creating environments which promote food security and provide healthy food options is somehow infringing on our basic rights and freedoms. Go figure.