Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


How to find a good dietitian


Photo by Orla MacEachern. Location: Local Source Market.

Last week after I wrote about the issue of dietitians sniping at each other I had a reader ask me how to find a “good” dietitian. That’s a bit of a tricky one but I’ll try my best to address it as it seems very fitting for Nutrition Month. If any of my fellow RDs (or anyone who’s seen a dietitian) have any other tips or suggestions please feel free to chime in, in the comments.

The process will vary from country to country but in Canada, every dietitian must be registered with the provincial regulatory body for the province in which they work. Here they are by province:

Newfoundland – Newfoundland and Labrador College of Dietitians

Nova Scotia – Nova Scotia Dietetic Association (NSDA)

New Brunswick – The New Brunswick Association of Dietitians (NBAD)

Prince Edward Island – PEI Dietitians Registration Board

Quebec – Order Professionnel des Diététistes du Québec

Ontario – College of Dietitians of Ontario

Manitoba – College of Dietitians of Manitoba

Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Yukon – Insofar as I can tell, because there are so few dietitians in the Territories, there are no regulatory bodies. Presumably, RDs working in these areas would maintain registration with the Provincial body where they completed their examination.

Saskatchewan – Saskatchewan Dietitians Association

Alberta – College of Dietitians of Alberta

British Columbia – The College of Dietitians of British Columbia

Some provinces (Ontario, Manitoba, and BC) have free provincial programs that the public can use to contact a dietitian via email or phone. This is a great option if you have a common nutrition concern or question.

Dietitians of Canada also maintains a list of private practice dietitians but it’s not a complete list as you must be a member of DC to be included. Some provinces also have organizations formed and run by dietitians such as the Dietitians Network Nova Scotia. Again, this is not a comprehensive list of all dietitians in NS as membership is voluntary. The nice thing about their list though, is it provides some detail regarding the area each RD works in and their specializations.

You may also wish to contact your local public health unit as they will be able to tell you about dietitian services offered in your area. Many grocery stores also employ dietitians who offer one-on-one nutrition counselling for a reasonable fee.

Once you’ve found all of the private practice dietitians in your area now it’s time for the tricky part. I suggest looking to see if they have a website, exploring the website to get a feel for whether or not they’ll be a good fit for you. As with any counsellor or heath care professional, not all personalities are going to be well-suited. Look to see if they have links to social media accounts and see if you can get an idea of their personality and nutrition philosophy from tweets and facebook posts.

You should be able to narrow-down your search to a few dietitians based on location and your assessment of their online presence. At that point, you may want to pick one and make an appointment for an initial assessment. If that goes well, excellent, you’ve found your RD. If not, there’s no harm in shopping around. The good thing is, we don’t often work in the same location (like hair stylists) so if you don’t like the fit with the first one you see, you can easily try another without fear of encountering the first at your appointment. Find someone who will help you determine your goals, barriers, and provide you with support to overcome those barriers to reach your nutrition goals. However, don’t expect your dietitian to do the work for you. We’ll be your biggest cheerleader and we’ll give you all the tools you need to get you eating your best but you still have to do the actual work and make the lifestyle changes.



Dietitians of Canada remove themselves from corporate sponsors back pockets!

Exciting news: at the close of Nutrition Month it seems that Dietitians of Canada has heard the pleas of many of us Canadian dietitians. As of next year they will no longer be accepting sponsorship from the food industry! This means members will no longer receive coupons for such products as bologna, nutrition posters prominently featuring pork, or fact sheets developed by multinational soft drink companies. This also means that Nutrition Month will be about improving the nutrition of the general population as it will no longer be driven by the agendas of sponsors such as Dairy Farmers of Canada and Hellman’s Mayonnaise. In the long-term it may even mean the elimination of Milk and Alternatives as a food group on Canada’s Food Guide. Imagine the possibilities that can be explored by a national dietetic body driven solely by scientifically proven nutrition research and common sense!



April Fools! If only it were true…

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Are you getting enough vegetables?

After a month of “busting” nutrition myths it seems only fitting to end with Canada’s Food Guide. Thanks for reading all month and I hope that you’ll continue to read as I return to my regularly scheduled ranting.
Myth 20: It’s too hard to eat all the vegetables and fruit recommended in Canada’s Food Guide.
What Dietitians of Canada says:
“It’s easier than you think! Canada’s Food Guide recommends adults enjoy seven to 10 servings of vegetables and fruit each day. That might sound like a lot, but serving sizes are not very big. For example, a medium fruit or half a cup of vegetables is all it takes to get one serving…”
What I say:
It is hard to eat all the vegetables and fruit recommended in CFG. That’s why you see campaigns like 5 a Day. If it was easy then we’d be seeing more than half of all adult Canadians eating the recommended number of food guide servings but we’re not. In 2008, 46.7% of Canadians reported consuming vegetables and fruit five or more times a day (Stats Can). Keep in mind that the minimum recommended number of Food Guide servings per day is seven, not five. Imagine how much lower the number of Canadians meeting the actual recommendations would be! So, should we lower the number of recommended servings to better match Canadian diets, just like the physical activity guidelines did? Probably not, it’s good to aim high. Just don’t feel badly if you’re not eating eight servings of vegetables and fruit a day. I know that on most days I’m definitely not. Put away your food guide and try to focus on eating a balanced, primarily plant-based diet and you should be okay.


Are artificial sweeteners even better than the real thing?

Myth 31: Artificial sweeteners have too many chemicals to be healthy.
What Dietitians of Canada says:
“Artificial sweeteners can be part of healthy eating. Health Canada approves all sweeteners for safety before they can be sold in Canada. health Canada also develops strict guidelines for how food producers can use a sweetener, as well as advice on how much is safe to eat each day. Artificial sweeteners add a sweet taste while limiting calories and can be enjoyed in moderation, as part of a healthy diet.”
What I say:
Oh boy, this is a contentious one. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to address it or not. Putting aside the obvious fact that everything is composed of chemical compounds, yep, you and all the food you eat… I know that, to-date, studies have shown that these artificial sweeteners are safe to consume. However, I’m still inclined to suggest having a little bit of a natural sweetener rather than a manufactured sweetener. We are the guinea pigs in the long-term study of the effects of non-nutritive artificial sweeteners. I also think that use of these artificial sweeteners may lead to over consumption. Just like when we took fat out of snack foods and then found out that people ended up actually eating more calories from sugar. But I’m just one of those people who thinks “better the devil you know than the devil you don’t know”. I used to eat foods sweetened with these non-nutritive sweeteners but I found that I became sensitized to the taste. Now, I find that I can’t enjoy yoghurt and cereals that contain them. Instead, I have plain yoghurt mixed with thawed frozen berries (fresh local berries in the summer) and cereal with no added sugar. That’s my personal preference. If you enjoy artificially sweetened foods I can’t give you a legitimate scientific reason not to continue to do so. However, I personally feel that you are better to have a small amount of real caloric sweetener (e.g. maple syrup, honey, or sugar) to satisfy your sweet tooth and try to choose more foods that don’t contain any form of sweetener.


Do you have time to cook supper tonight?

Myth 11: Cooking meals at home takes way too much time.
What Dietitians of Canada says:
“Getting a healthy, home-cooked meal on the table doesn’t take as much time as you think. Simple, nutritious foods can make tasty meals, and planning meals in advance lets you use your time wisely. For example, try making “planned extras” (Leftovers on purpose) that can be used for another meal, or make big batches of food on weekends, freeze small portions and defrost on nights when time is tight. Cooking at home doesn’t mean never using convenience foods, like pre-washed, ready-to-eat vegetables or pre-cut fresh meat skewers, can be time savers that help get meals to the table quickly.”
What I say:
Full disclosure: As a single person I can’t really know the realities of being a working parent and trying to feed a family. I am also an anomaly in that I cook full family size recipes on the weekend, portion out and freeze for lunches and suppers throughout the week. I go to the gym or run after work and I have no desire to cook a meal by the time I’ve gotten home and showered. I don’t even want to wait the half hour that a quick meal would take, the two minutes to reheat something is plenty long enough for me. It’s easy for me to fit enough food in the freezer for myself and to cook enough on the weekend. I can imagine that this system would be a lot more complicated if I was also feeding three other people. However, I don’t think most people are fitness junkies like I am so that gym time could be put toward meal prep. (Even if you are, it is still possible to cook post-gym, I have done it when necessary.) If you’re part of a couple, try cooking together or dividing the duties (e.g. if one cooks, the other cleans). If you have children get them involved in the process. Bonus: picky kids are far more likely to eat a meal if they’ve had a hand in making it. Try doing all the washing and chopping of veg the night before, or make slow cooker meals so that you don’t have too much to do when you get home in the evening. Nutritious meals can be hugely time-consuming to prepare, they can also take as little time as 20 minutes. There are lots of 30-minute-or-less healthy cookbooks out there. While I think sometimes they’re mistaken about how much time things actually take when you’re not a professional chef (really Jamie Oliver, mustard chicken, quick dauphinoise, greens, and black forest affogato all in under 30 minutes!?) there are some great ideas out there and you can build up a repertoire of quick and healthy meals with a little practice.