Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


What foods will dietitians never eat?

One of my social media friends, and a regular reader, sent me a link to a list of 16 Foods Dietitians Won’t Touch because he knows how much I love loathe those sorts of lists. To be fair, there are a number of foods on there that I don’t usually eat. However, there are some that I do, bad RD that I am. I could go through the entire list and debate the merits and faults of each product but that’s tedious and beside the point.

The real point is that lists like this are unhelpful at best and harmful at worst. What’s the harm in telling people that dietitians never eat fibre bars or fried foods, you might ask. Well, a healthy diet is a diet that involves a pattern of healthy food consumption. It’s also one that allows for flexibility and occasional treats. What those treats are depends on the person. When we say we “never touch” certain foods we’re often having the opposite effect from what we want. We’re making those foods more desirable. You know, forbidden fruit (candy, smoked meat, fast food…) and all that. Once you tell yourself that you’re not allowed to have a particular food you’re basically setting the timer on your diet (I know, the dreaded d-word). Once you “cave” and have that forbidden food all bets are off. You’re more likely to abandon all of your healthy habits because after all, what’s the point, you’re a failure.

Contrast that with a diet in which you generally consume a variety of nutritious foods but in which no foods are off-limits. If you choose to eat one of those “16 foods dietitians won’t touch” it’s no big deal. You might (probably won’t) eat a lot of those foods regularly but you’ll enjoy them when you do because you never forbade yourself from eating them. You know that part of a healthy eating pattern is allowing yourself to have treats and not putting any foods entirely off-limits no matter what ridiculous articles like the one that prompted this post may tell you.


Follow Friday: @emmatrainRD


Emma Train (nee Holly) and I met early in our nutrition degrees and have stayed in touch since then. You do some good bonding when you’re lab partners in Dr. Kwan’s foods lab and then biochem. Not to mention the interminable bus rides to uni on the 80. Ah, memories. Since then, Emma has provided me with many blog topics (including the damn Ideal Protein, aka the post that won’t die) and now has joined me on the writing and ranting train.

Emma just had her first piece published in Ask Men about nutrition myths that need to die. You can also find her blogging at In Your Face Nutrition where she shares cooking tips, recipes, and food and nutrition thoughts. You can also find her on all of the social medias: Twitter @emmatrainRD, Facebook Emma Train RD, and Instagram @inyourfacenutrition.

Leave a comment

Follow Friday @VincciRD


I’ve been following Vincci on social media for years now. She’s one of the first dietitians I followed, actually. Personally, I’m not interested in the generic nutrition tips that come from many social media accounts run by RDs. Fortunately, Vincci’s not like that. She shares photos of LOTS of delicious food that she eats (and sometimes prepares) on her Instagram account. On Twitter she shares nutrition tips, true, but she also shares her own experiences and opinions.

If you’re looking for support and motivation kickstarting your own healthy eating habit you might want to sign-up for her free 4-3-2-1 Countdown to Wellness Challenge. This challenge will help you figure out what matters most, focus on that, and navigate all of the nutrition nonsense out there. Did I mention it’s free??

You can find Vincci blogging on her website (along with loads of other great stuff). She also blogs at Ceci n’est pas un food blog where she shares things around Calgary and some lovely recipes. Like and follow her on Facebook too.


Leave a comment

Follow Friday: World Food for Student Cooks


My friend, and fellow dietitian, Krista McLellan wrote a cookbook! World Food for Student Cooks is geared toward uni students who love great street food and want to learn to make healthy delicious affordable versions at home. Even if you’re not a student you’ll probably enjoy this cookbook. It’s got recipes like bahn mi, spicy mango salad, and, or course, pizza.


Leave a comment

Granola: breakfast or dessert?


I love granola. It’s part of most of my breakfasts. This despite the recent article in which dietitians decreed granola to be a dessert. Whatever. I love breakfast for supper and, apparently, dessert for breakfast. That being said, I do think that granola can be a part of a healthy breakfast just as it can be an rather unhealthy start to the day.

There are a couple of factors that come to play in making granola a part of a healthy breakfast. One is the sad fact that most commercially available granolas are just oats and sugar held together by fat. Homemade granola can be the same. It can also be loaded with healthy nuts and seeds. It all depends on what you put in it. The key is that you get to decide what goes into it. Of course, it’s still going to be calorically dense and probably will have a fair amount of sugar and/or fat in it, depending on the recipe.

This is where the second factor comes into play. It’s all about serving size. Rather than having a bowlful of granola you should be treating granola as a topping. Adding a bit of granola to a bowl of shredded wheat with some blueberries or sliced banana makes it taste a whole lot better and adds the protein, fibre, vitamins, and minerals from the nuts and seeds. Granola also adds a bit of crunch to a smoothie bowl or some fruit and yoghurt. I’ve even had roasted sweet potato topped with peanut butter, yogurt, and granola.

Granola can be a healthy choice. It’s all about how you treat it.

One of my current favourite granola recipes is a modified version of Angela Liddon’s recipe in her Oh She Glows cookbook.

Feel free to share your favourite granola recipes below or your favourite ways to include granola as a part of a nutritious breakfast.