Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Follow Friday: Getting to Yum

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I heard about this great resource on the radio (CBC of course!) a few weeks back. It sounds like a fantastic tool for parents to raise non-picky eaters. It includes tips for parents of children who are already picky eaters, and for parents of infants who want to ensure that they don’t become picky eaters. It’s never to late to learn to enjoy healthy foods!


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No girl can live on chicken nuggets alone

By now you’ve probably heard about Stacey Irvine, the 17-year-old Brit who was recently rushed to the hospital after collapsing due to her diet of chicken nuggets, and the occasional chips, french fries, or toast. Apparently she has been hooked on chicken nuggets since she was two-years-old and has never even tried a vegetable (apart from fried potatoes). Apparently her mum gave up trying to feed her other things as she would refuse to eat them. I’m not a parent but seriously, what responsible parent allows their child to become hooked on chicken nuggets and fries at the age of two!? And how is it that she has never eaten vegetables? What was her mum feeding her in between the time that she was weaned and the fateful day that she first had chicken nuggets in a restaurant? Now, I was a notoriously picky eater (I could spot a speck of onion in tomato sauce a mile away and I can recall sitting at the kitchen table for at least an hour after everyone else was done because I refused to eat my liver and onions or kipper or whatever it was we were having for supper) and I really didn’t get much better until I was in my 20s. However, I can’t understand how this situation could occur. Someone needs to accept responsibility here and it’s not a two-year-old child. Firstly, she should not have been given chicken nuggets and fries at the age of two. If a child isn’t exposed to a food then they’re not going to know what they’re missing out on. Secondly, it can take MANY (sometimes more than ten) exposures to new foods before a child will accept them. You need to have patience and you need to have a backbone if you want to raise a healthy child.