Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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How pregnancy has made me confront my own weight bias

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Two months to go! Photo credit: Randall Andrews

I have a confession to make and I’ve gone back and forth about whether or not to write about it because I’m not proud of this. However, I’m taking a deep breath and going for it because I think that it’s important to acknowledge these things.

During the first trimester as I started to gain weight but wasn’t yet obviously pregnant I found myself struggling with the thought that people might think I was *gasp* fat. As someone who has always had a small body I have lived a life rich in thin privilege. Despite my support of HAES and firm belief that people should not be judged by their weight I realized that I wasn’t comfortable extending this mindset to my own body. My body is small, my body has always been small, and therefore, my body should remain small. It’s great for other people to accept their own larger bodies but I, I am ashamed to admit, am not willing to accept that my own body could be anything other than small.

When I would go running at the local indoor track, as my clothes became a little tighter around my belly, I imagined people thinking “good for her, trying to lose weight”. I also imagined people who knew me thinking “looks like she’s not running as much these days”. or passing other judgements on my physique. I was pissed at these people for judging my body. I wanted to wear a sign to tell the world that my imperceptible weight gain was due to the fetus growing inside of me, not because I’m incapable of taming my unruly body. And then I was ashamed and disappointed in myself for not extending the courtesy of body acceptance to my own body as it changed. I was also ashamed because this was how I envisioned others thinking about strangers bodies. Do people really pass these judgements on each other? On themselves? Why did I care what people were (or weren’t) thinking about my body? How have I allowed so much of my identity to be tied to my size? And how self-absorbed of me to presume that others are spending any time judging my body – given the number of people who expressed surprise upon learning I was pregnant when I thought it was pretty obvious people are not nearly as attuned to my body as I imagined. 

As my belly grew and it became more obvious that it contained a tiny human and not just one too many cheeseburgers I became physically less comfortable but mentally more comfortable. People started to compliment me on my “adorable bump”. It feels good to have an acceptable larger body but I’m still carrying that extra guilt around too. It’s not right that women in larger bodies should be shamed while I’m praised for my belly. I truly have no more control over the shape and size of my “bump” as this fetus grows inside me than I have over my height or the size of my feet. 

I truly believe that we do people, particularly women, a disservice by not talking more about how our bodies change over time. It’s as though we all expect to reach a certain size and then remain there permanently. This is not realistic. Our sizes and shapes changes over time for myriad reasons. This is part of being a human in possession of a body. Some people may remain a similar size and shape for decades while others will evolve by the season (winterspeck anyone?). This is all natural.

As I previously wrote, women don’t need to “get their bodies back” after pregnancy. Our bodies have not gone anywhere, they have simply adapted to meet current demands. My new philosophy (during pregnancy and postpartum): my body is going to be the size it wants and needs to be right now.


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What to eat when you’re pregnant

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By now you may be aware that I’m pregnant. This is great news both personally and for more blog material – apologies if prenatal nutrition is of no interest to you. Now that the word is out, I feel comfortable sharing some of my observations.

First off, take the nutrition advice from apps with a grain of salt. These were likely not developed by registered dietitians and may not contain the greatest information. Aside from those, you might be getting your nutrition recommendations from prenatal classes which you would think would be better but I wasn’t super impressed with some of the information provided in the online class that I did (here’s hoping the in-person class is better!).

The general advice is fine: this is an important time to be getting adequate nutrition as, though technically not, the fetus is pretty damn close to a parasite. It’s going to deplete you of all of your iron and calcium stores if you don’t makes sure you’re consuming enough to replenish them. However, I took exception to some of the outdated advice I saw in the class I completed.

There’s a section on gestational diabetes which is followed-up by the section on prenatal nutrition. In this section there’s a sample meal plan which is whack for anyone, let alone a pregnant woman who is concerned about developing gestational diabetes. Highlights include breakfast: toast, oatmeal with banana, jam, and a glass of milk; snack: vanilla yoghurt and dried apricots; bedtime snack: frozen yoghurt. Hello blood sugar spikes! And I mean honestly, who eats toast and oatmeal for breakfast? Get some damn protein in there (nut butter, nuts, seeds, eggs…). And that snack, smh. Plain or no sugar-added yoghurt with berries would be a better choice or there are loads of other nutritious snack options that don’t contain sugar. I thought we’d moved past recommending frozen yoghurt like a decade ago. It’s generally higher in sugar than ice cream and not nearly as nutritious as regular un-frozen yoghurt. Which leads me to the swap suggestions.

There was a page of “if you’re craving this, try that”. Not that there was anything wrong with the suggestions (things like pretzels instead of potato chips and a grilled chicken burger instead of a regular beef burger) but I’m of the mind that you should listen to your body and give it what it wants. There is nothing wrong with having some chips or a burger when you’re pregnant, or when you’re not. And then there was that freaking frozen yoghurt again! I saw ice cream and groaned and said to my boyfriend, “how much do you want to bet they’re going to say to have froyo instead?” Wisely, not a bet he was willing to take as, of course, it was frozen yoghurt.

At one point they advised to “avoid foods with chemicals” which is meaningless and completely unhelpful advice. All food is comprised of chemicals.

I also wish that they had acknowledged the food aversions, cravings, and nausea/vomiting that many pregnant women experience. For women who are experiencing severe “morning” sickness it can be better to eat what they can stomach when they can stomach it. You can tell women to eat lots of vegetables, fish, and whole grains but if these foods aren’t going to sit well with them then that advice is not helpful. Women who require advice beyond that provided in the online class should ask their doctor for a referral to see a Registered Dietitian. Those living in Ontario can also call Telehealth Ontario at 1-866-797-0000 Monday-Friday 9-5 to speak with a RD for free.

There should also be recognition that listening to our bodies and our hunger and fullness cues is important. If you want ice cream, eat some ice cream. And if you want frozen yoghurt (to each their own), eat some froyo. Just like you’ll learn when it comes time for infant feeding, you should trust yourself and trust your tummy.