Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Why obesity prevention is not the answer

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One of my twitter friends recently shared a link to this article: How Early Should Obesity Prevention Start? My immediate reaction was that they’re asking the wrong question. They should be asking how early health promotion should start.

While I think that the authors make some good points about obesity influences beginning in the womb, I stand by my initial reaction. No one likes to hear the term obesity. No one wants to be told that they’re obese or that their weight may cause their children to become obese. Is an obesity intervention really going to make much of a difference? I’m doubtful. Framing such an intervention as health promotion, and not only targeting overweight and obese women might be slightly more effective. However, these interventions are still putting the onus on the individual. Interventions targeting individuals and groups serve a purpose in the battle against obesity in the same manner that food banks serve a purpose in the battle against food insecurity and poverty. They are bandaid solutions for gaping wounds.

As I’ve said many times before: we need systemic change. The only way that we’re going to truly see a decrease in obesity rates is if we, as a society, change. We need to put more emphasis on food preparation and incorporating physical activity and exercise into our daily routines. We need to stop wearing long workdays and sleep deprivation as badges of honour. The best way to address the obesity problem is to not talk about obesity.