Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


2 Comments

Call in the food police, we’ve got another unruly body

zombomeme24062018183417

I feel the need to expand on something I touched on in my post last week. It’s related to people judging dietitians on the basis of our weight. My previous post mainly discussed why it’s inappropriate to judge anyone’s professional abilities, including dietitians, on the basis of their perceived size. However, I think this all too common judgement also speaks to the lack of understanding of what we do.

There’s a common (mis)perception that dietitians are all weight loss counsellors. As a result, if we don’t have that elusive “perfect body” people think that we suck at our jobs. After all, what else do we do other than police the food people put into their mouths. If we can’t control the food going into our own mouths, how on earth can we possibly control the food going into the mouths of all the other owners of “unruly” bodies. While some dietitians certainly do work in weight management, even those dietitians are not actually food police. The majority of dietitians don’t work in weight management. Curious what a dietitian actually does, check out this old post.

It is not part of my job to control my body so that it fits your perceived notion of healthy and fit. Whether or not I am large has no bearing on my knowledge of nutrition. It does not impede my ability to calculate a tube feed, modify a recipe, expound on celiac disease, or help someone with diabetes manage their blood sugar. Just as being small and having no knowledge of nutrition does not automatically imbue me with the capacity to do these things. As with any profession, the size of a dietitian is not a reflection of their knowledge, experience, or capability.

Dietitians do So Much More than help people lose weight. Despite the impression that our name gives, we are not all about putting people on diets. For many of us, aside from medically necessary diets (for example in the case of allergy sufferers or those with celiac disease) “diet” is a four letter word. We’re not all on a mission to rein in unruly bodies and create a world populated solely by thin bodies. When we do work in positions of counsel we usually aim to help people to gain greater compassion for, and appreciation of their own bodies. To help people view food as a source of pleasure rather than an enemy out to destroy our hard-fought-for chiselled physiques.


Leave a comment

The false dichotomy of fitness and weight

hnrvqPvbW6zcw8TE

Someone shared a link to this CBC article The Great Weight Debate on twitter with the statement “Why your body would probably prefer you to be fit rather than thin. Great Weight Debate & what healthy really means”. Reading the article, I don’t really have much issue with it. In fact, it doesn’t seem to be much of a debate at all. It’s basically just making the point that you don’t need to e super thin, or a certain BMI, to be healthy. You can be classified as “overweight” and still be fit. No argument here. My issue is really just with the original tweet and that sentiment.

Why are fitness and thinness being turned into a dichotomy? I take objection to that notion as a person who considers myself to be both fit and thin. Why must we take a negative view of one body type in order to put another type in a more positive light?

Naturally, a person can be thin and unhealthy, as can a person at any weight. Being fit and thin are not mutually exclusive. Just as being fit and overweight are not. Health at Every Size, people!