Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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The day the Internet dies

Sometimes I think that we would all be so much better off if the Internet collapsed. Or at the very least, social media networks.

I was reading this article: The Death of Civility in the Digital Age that Yoni Freedhoff shared on his blog last week and thinking about how true it is. People are so ready to attack, always looking for a fight, on social media. The interaction of your fingers with your computer or mobile phone sending out words to someone you’ve probably never even met irl is vastly different from having a conversation with someone face-to-face, or even over the phone. It’s so easy to respond hastily and to neglect to consider that your words will be read by a real actual live human.

While I love that I can find the answer to nearly any question immediately on a tiny computer I carry in my purse I find myself more and more often wondering if it’s worth the cost we’re paying. Egregious cellphone bills in Canada aside, I mean what we’re paying in declining humanity and rampant misinformation.

I can find the answer to nearly any question online but anyone can put what they believe to be the answer out there. This means, especially in the world of nutrition, that there can be heaps of misleading, inaccurate, and completely false information that I need to sift through and assess before I come to the correct answer. There is an ever growing mountain of misinformation online and a tide of dietary dogma on social media. It’s ever so tempting to just shut it out but I feel an obligation to stay online to fight it, to try to dilute it with as much truth as I can. Which is hard because there aren’t many hard and fast truths when it comes to a balanced diet, despite what the radical carnivores, vegans, ketoites (I don’t know what they call themselves), LCHF-ists, HCLF-ists, etc etc would have you believe.

I also hate the constant need for self-promotion. I’m reading the novel Radiant Shimmering Light right now and the whole obsession with getting likes on IG, and RTs on Twitter really rings true. There are a few characters in the book who are “lifestyle” bloggers and they present these varnished, edited versions of their lives as currency. They make money through links on their websites and through selling the idea of perfection and self-marketing. The book is kind of poking fun at this world we’ve created but it’s done so in a way that you really feel the anxiety-provoking compulsion of the narrator to check her notifications. It’s nearly impossible for a dietitian, especially one in private practice, to not use social media. There are dietitians who make a living by coaching others on how to optimize their Instagram feeds. Like are you even a dietitian if you’re not posting perfectly styled photos of acai smoothie bowls and kale salads?

Our years of nutrition education and proof of ongoing education are no longer enough. Now we must be savvy social media marketers, chefs, expert food stylists, and photographers. We must be brands in and of ourselves. We must constantly be competing with self-styled nutrition gurus, other dietitians, and ourselves. I know that I’ve probably got my rose-coloured glasses on, but I yearn for a day when I don’t have to see literal meatheads mocking people for eating plants on twitter. When I can be blissfully unaware of the insane dietary advice naturopaths and some chiropractors are doling out to their clients. When I don’t have to see dietitians promoting juice as nutritious.  When we can all just stay in our lanes and do the jobs we were trained to do.


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Follow Friday: @CaraAnselmo

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In the wake of the election results I feel like we could all use a little ray of sunshine in our lives. Cara is always a ray of sunshine in my twitter feed. Even when she’s having a bad day, she always manages to find the positive. It makes sense that she’s a member of Earthathon‘s Runshine team and is always dedicating her miles to her tweeps.

As an RDN, Cara specializes in oncology nutrition and has blogged about related topics on her website. She’s also a certified yoga instructor which may be of interest to those of you in NY.


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Hey food industry, get out of RD conferences! #FNCE

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I had a blog post all written for you lovelies, cued-up, ready to go. Then I started seeing the tweets coming out of FNCE (Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo) and I got all annoyed and tweeted what you see above because apparently I’m a masochist. That unleashed a fun afternoon of back-and-forth with fellow RDs on twitter who either don’t see conflict of interest as an issue in our profession or don’t really care.

I keep being about to say “I’m sorry but…” but I’m NOT SORRY DAMMITYou are not immune to marketing. No one is immune. Not me, not you, not anyone and if you think you are then you are the extremely rare exception or you are sorely mistaken. Many dietitians (myself included) regularly bemoan that we can’t get any respect as a profession. Do you really think that showing your influence can be bought with a free sample is helping us to become respected on the same level as other healthcare professionals?

Let me tell you a little tale. Once upon a time I worked in a grocery store (yes, I was an RD at this time). In my position I was responsible for a department, helping customers, teaching classes, providing demos, etc. Myself, and others in the same role at other stores regularly received training, lunch and learns, and samples from vendors. Product knowledge is important if you are talking to customers about food and supplements. The thing is, we didn’t receive training on or samples of all brands. So which products were we more likely to recommend? The ones we’d gotten to try, the ones we felt more connected to. Sure, I never recommended a product that I was morally against (I told people not to buy raspberry ketones if they asked for my opinion)or didn’t genuinely like, but I’m sure that there were equally good alternatives to many products that I didn’t steer people toward because I had no experience with them.

So, when dietitians argue that industry at conferences is fine, I disagree. Sure, walnuts and almonds are great but if they’re the only nuts there what are the chances that dietitians are going to be subconsciously influenced to promote those to their clients over nuts that don’t have representation at the expo? Yoghurt’s great and there are myriad options at grocery stores. If Siggi’s and Chobani are the only yoghurt brands represented at FNCE, which brands do you think that RDs are going to be more likely to choose and recommend?

Some argued that the FNCE is, in part, an expo. True enough, but as a conference organized by the national dietetic organization in the US it’s expected that most attendees will be dietitians. The focus should be on providing them with current evidence-based nutrition information.Having a captive RD audience for marketing at a conference organized by a body that’s meant to represent RDs is reprehensible. It’s time for the FNCE to drop the E.

Lest you still believe that RDs are a higher breed of human and somehow immune to conflicts of interest and marketing tactics, check out the selection of tweets below. Names and handles have been removed because this is not about singling out dietitians, it’s about drawing attention to the larger issue. Kudos to the companies present at FNCE for generating all of these free advertisements. Shame on the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for allowing this to occur.

 

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Follow Friday @VincciRD

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I’ve been following Vincci on social media for years now. She’s one of the first dietitians I followed, actually. Personally, I’m not interested in the generic nutrition tips that come from many social media accounts run by RDs. Fortunately, Vincci’s not like that. She shares photos of LOTS of delicious food that she eats (and sometimes prepares) on her Instagram account. On Twitter she shares nutrition tips, true, but she also shares her own experiences and opinions.

If you’re looking for support and motivation kickstarting your own healthy eating habit you might want to sign-up for her free 4-3-2-1 Countdown to Wellness Challenge. This challenge will help you figure out what matters most, focus on that, and navigate all of the nutrition nonsense out there. Did I mention it’s free??

You can find Vincci blogging on her website (along with loads of other great stuff). She also blogs at Ceci n’est pas un food blog where she shares things around Calgary and some lovely recipes. Like and follow her on Facebook too.

 


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The dirty game of fast food charity #MiracleTreatDay #BurgerstoBeatMS

Last week it was “Burgers to Beat MS Day”. A couple of weeks ago it was “Miracle Treat Day”. Each occasion got me a little riled up and I sent out a few snarky tweets about the “occasions”.

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In case you’re not aware of these clever marketing opportunities fundraising initiatives let me give you a quick run down. On Miracle Treat Day (I feel wrong capitalizing this, these days aren’t worthy of anything more than lowercase) $1 from every blizzard sold in the US and Canada was donated to participating Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. Burgers to Beat MS is pretty much the same except it’s $1 from A&W teen burger sales going to the MS Society of Canada. These are just two examples of fast food aligning themselves with healthcare to detract from the fact that regular consumption of fast food contributes to a number of diseases.

It’s a total win-win. The fast food corporation comes out looking like they’re doing amazing things to cure disease and improve the lives of sick children. They also make money while doing it ($1 is not the cost of a teen burger or a blizzard and most people will buy more than the one item). The hashtags are all over twitter for the day garnering free positive publicity for the company which surely boosts sales well after the one day promotion ends. You really can’t fault the fast food companies for creating such initiatives. I also don’t fault the people buying the blizzards and the burgers. Who doesn’t want to be made to feel like they’re doing a good deed by eating a delicious blizzard or burger? If you can help suffering children or cure MS by eating a treat, why not? The real fault lies with the hospitals and MS Society, and all the other organizations that willingly embrace this form of fundraising. Of course, to be fair, the real real fault lies with the lack of government funding for these vital organizations but the buck has to stop somewhere and I think that hospitals and organizations promoting health should not associate themselves with fundraisers that promote illness.

I’d also like to get people thinking a little bit more critically about charitable fundraising. Dairy Queen proudly proclaims that in 2015, over $5 million was donated to Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals across the US and Canada as a result of Miracle Treat Day. In 2014, international DQ sales were $4.1 billion and Dairy Queen was one of the world’s top performing fast food chains. That $5 million that sounds like so much to us average people is less than pennies to DQ. It’s about 0.12% of total sales. $5 million is next to nothing for one hospital’s budget, let alone spread amongst the 170 hospitals in the network. That’s $29, 411 per hospital; about 10% of the cost of an MRI machine or nearly 7% of the salary for one pediatric surgeon. Whereas, assuming the average blizzard size purchased is a medium, DQ is pocketing about $15 million in sales from Miracle Treat Day. This is solely from the sale of blizzards alone, on one day. In comparison, A&W’s Burgers to Beat MS has resulted in a paltry $8 million in donations to the MS Society of Canada over the past seven years.

How sad is it that hospitals and organizations like the MS Society are so desperate for funding that they’re willing to provide marketing for fast food chains and to encourage the consumption of less than nutritious foods for a little more funding?

No, I am not opposed to burgers and blizzards. However, I don’t think that we need to be encouraged to consume these foods anymore than we already do. How does raising a little money for one chronic disease justify the development of other chronic diseases incurred by the regular consumption of fast food? At what expense are these “healthcare” organizations willing to get a few bucks? I know that many people think “it’s just one treat” but when it’s something you’re only buying because you’re being made to feel good about it by the charity aspect and these events are happening on the regular it’s never “just one”. It’s part of a broader problem in our food environment. There’s constant justification for the consumption of treats and foods that should be consumed infrequently. There is no excuse for promoting heart disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and type two diabetes under the guise of supporting hospitals and health charities.

I implore the hospitals and charities not to participate in such fundraising endeavours. I beg the government to start allocating more of my tax dollars to healthcare funding; especially toward health promotion and disease prevention.

It’s not all on the government and organizations though. As long as we as consumers continue to support these promotions with our money, our mouths, and our hashtags, the companies and organizations involved will continue to conduct them. The next time one of these days comes around please consider donating the money you would have spent on fast food to a charity of your choice. If you do participate in the fundraiser please don’t share it on social media. Dairy Queen, A&W, and all of the other fast food chains don’t need your free advertising.