Dispelling nutrition myths, ranting, and occasionally, raving


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Grocery Store Lessons: Liberte Baby Yoghurt

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Baby yoghurt isn’t a new product. I had thought about blogging about it a while ago and then forgot and then thought that it had been discontinued. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. File this one under ridiculous unnecessary products that you never need to buy.

There is no reason that a baby needs yoghurt with added sugar. And that’s what this product is. It’s a series of yoghurts with 6% milk fat. You’re supposed to start them on the plain (with a mere teaspoon of sugar per 75 gram package). Ingredients: whole milk, cream, cane sugar, milk protein concentrate, bacterial cultures, and vitamin D. Then you can progress to the yoghurts at “step 2”; banana or strawberry.

The banana and strawberry both have 7 grams (just under two teaspoons of sugar) per 75 gram serving.

Ingredients in the banana: whole milk, fruit preparation (banana puree [i.e. flavoured sugar], cane sugar, water, tapioca starch, pectin, natural flavour, lemon juice concentrate), cream, cane sugar, milk protein, concentrate, bacterial cultures, and vitamin D.

Ingredients in the strawberry: whole milk, fruit preparation (strawberry pureecane sugar, water, rice starch, natural flavour, carrot juice concentrate, cranberry juice concentrate, lemon juice concentrate), cream, cane sugar, milk protein concentrate, bacterial cultures, vitamin D.

Babies don’t need sweetened yoghurt. Just because many adults need sugary flavoured yoghurts doesn’t mean that babies do. Their tastebuds are much more sensitive than ours and they’re also learning what they like (and dislike). There’s no need for us to impose our preferences and sweet teeth on them. Lots of babies enjoy the tangy taste of plain full-fat yoghurt.

Parents don’t need to shell out the extra cash for smaller servings of plain yoghurt for their babies. Save your cash and get unsweetened plain yoghurt for your baby.


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How to choose yoghurt (#FF @canva)

Choosing Yogurt

Do you like the infographic I made? It’s pretty simplified (but that’s what infographics are supposed to be, right?). I know that the yoghurt (or yogurt if you’re anyone else in North America besides me) aisle can be overwhelming so I made this little guy to help you navigate it.

That’s where the Follow Friday came in. I used Canva which was totally free and very easy to work with. If you’re looking to make a simple infographic and don’t have the funds to pay a graphic designer I definitely recommend checking them out.


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Can yoghurt prevent diabetes?

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A friend of mine recently shared the news of a new study reporting an association between yoghurt consumption and decreased risk of type 2 diabetes.

The study was actually a meta-analysis of three large studies. Meta-analyses always make me a little nervous due to the ease of cherry picking and interpreting the results to yield the desired effect. The results of a meta-analysis can only be as good as the results of the original studies on which they’re based. I’m not saying this was the case here, just that it’s something to bear in mind when reading about meta-analyses. The researchers do have on their side the fact that all three studies had large sample sizes. After examining the results of these three studies, they added an additional 11 prospective-cohort studies for their meta-analysis.

The researchers controlled for a number of potential confounders. However, there’s always a remaining risk that an unaccounted for confounding variable might be the true reason for any observed effect. While the researchers reported a significant decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in regular yoghurt consumers they were also quick to acknowledge that this does not indicate causation. Yes, people who consume yoghurt appear to be less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people who don’t. However, the studies all relied upon self-reported food frequency questionnaires and they were observational. It is possible that there is some unaccounted for variable that’s reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes in yoghurt consumers other than the yoghurt.

The researchers do make an interesting suggestion that the probiotics in yoghurt may be responsible for the decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. I do wonder about the validity of this as many yoghurts contain limited live bacteria due to their processing. In addition, it’s unlikely that many probiotics in yoghurt survive the acidic stomach environment to make their way to the intestines. Perhaps it’s the by-products of the bacteria in the yoghurt (e.g. vitamins, lactic acid) that are responsible for decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. Just postulating here. I would love to see a study in which participants are prescribed diets containing either yoghurt with live bacteria, yoghurt without live bacteria, and no yoghurt. Yes, it would take a long time to determine if the yoghurt reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes but other effects could be examined as well and it would be interesting to see what the true effects of  regular yoghurt consumption are on health.


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Grocery store lessons: Greek yoghurt

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I’ve extolled the virtues of Greek yoghurt in the past. It’s a pretty great source of protein at up to 18 grams in 3/4 of a cup! Of course, once something gets popular you know that the knock-offs aren’t far behind. I think that nearly every brand of yoghurt now has their own line of Greeks on the market. Unfortunately, many of them aren’t actually Greek yoghurt.

True Greek yoghurt is made by straining regular yoghurt so that you’re left with a thick creamy yoghurt. This separation of the whey (that’s the watery stuff that’s strained out) leaves the Greek yoghurt rich in protein but also removes some of the calcium… It can’t all be good, right? While a serving of plain yoghurt has about 30% of your daily recommended calcium, a serving of Greek yoghurt only has about 15% of your daily recommended calcium. But I digress…

What’s wrong with the “knock-off” Greek yoghurts? Well, they’re not strained. Instead of just containing milk and bacterial culture they add thickeners like carrageenan, corn starch and pectin to achieve a thick Greek-style creaminess. They also add milk protein to bump up the protein content but from the ones I’ve seen that still only puts them at 8 grams of protein per serving. That’s actually less protein than you’ll find in many traditional plain yoghurts. Most of them also tend to be targeted at the “dieting” community so they’re sweetened with artificial sweeteners. And lest you think “at least I’m still getting the calcium I would from traditional yoghurt” you’re probably only getting about 10% of the Daily Value.

If protein and a thick creamy yoghurt are what you’re looking for make sure to check the ingredient panel as well as the Nutrition Facts Panel to ensure you’re getting exactly what you bargained for. When it comes to yoghurt ingredients, less is definitely more.

*The photo above shows the Nutrition Facts for a traditional Greek yoghurt and a “knock-off” Greek. Can you tell which is which?


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Greek yoghurt

Oops, I forgot to write a post yesterday. Sorry about that! I hope you managed to survive all right without me.

I thought that I’d write a little bit about Greek yoghurt today as there’s been some recent lobbying in the US to make it separate from regular yoghurt on their My Plate food guide.

People often ask me if Greek yoghurt is a healthy food and if it’s really any better than regular yoghurt. This is one of those foods that lives up to the hype. As long as you’re getting the low-fat or fat-free Greek yoghurt (and preferably plain) you’re making a great choice. Greek yoghurt generally has 14-18 grams of protein per serving. Which is about 2-3 times as much as traditional yoghurt. However, if you’re buying the individual, fruit-flavoured portions you may be getting less protein (and lots more sugar); make sure that you read the nutrition facts panel. As far as other nutrients go, there’s not a whole lot of difference between Greek yoghurt and other yoghurt. All yoghurt has bacterial culture. Greek yoghurt is essentially regular yoghurt that’s been strained so that it’s extra thick and creamy.

If you don’t like plain yoghurt mix yours with some fresh or frozen fruit for a snack or part of your breakfast. I also like to use Greek yoghurt in place of mayonnaise in recipes. I’ve had great success using it to make a curry “mayo” for salmon cakes, and in potato salad.